Woody Ornamentals

Showing 33–36 of 54 results

  • Hypericum kalmianum Kalm’s St. Johns wort SHRUB Z 4-7

    Yellow saucers with a puff of showy stamens in mid to late summer

    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Yellow saucers with a puff of showy stamens in mid to late summer, compliment the glaucous blue leaves on this small mounding, evergreen shrub.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: sun to shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil. Blooms on new growth so prune in late winter to early spring as far back as you wish.
    Native: Quebec to WI, S. to IL
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and butterflies
    Awards: Great Plants for Great Plains

    The name Hypericum comes from Greek hyper  meaning “above”, and eikon, meaning “icon or image”. The yellow flowers of some species were placed above images to ward off evil spirits, and according to legend, Satan pierced the leaves in revenge. This species collected by & named for Peter Kalm, Swedish plant hunter, on his expedition in North America before 1753.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex decidua Possumhaw, Yaupon, Meadow holly Z 5-9

    The beauty is in the berries, orange-red berries ripen in September and persist throughout the winter to dazzle the landscape, until mid-March when new growth begins on this small, deciduous tree.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    The beauty is in the berries, orange-red berries ripen in September and persist throughout the winter to dazzle the landscape,  until mid-March when new growth begins on this small, deciduous tree.

    Size: 10-15’ x 10-15’
    Care: sun to part-shade in acidic, moist to moist well-drained soil, OK in clay
    Native: SE & Central US
    Wildlife Value: The fruit attracts birds, deer and some small mammals, including opossums, but is poisonous to people.
    Awards: Oklahoma Proven 2001

    Described in literature in 1788.
    Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex verticillata Winterberry holly Z 3-9 FEMALE

    White flowers in May turning to dense clusters of lurid red berries lasting from fall into winter.

    $15.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    White flowers in May turning to dense clusters of lurid red berries lasting from fall into winter.

    Size: 6-16’ x 6-10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Canada to FL, West to Wisconsin and MO.
    Wildlife Value: important food for winter birds incl. Robins & Chickadees

    Collected before 1753 by John Bartram who called it “Prinos.” Jefferson described the Winterberry on March 1 in Virginia, “the swamps in this neighborhood are now red with this berry…(it is) peculiar to America and is a real treasure.” L H Bailey (1933) called it,”one of the best hardy shrubs with ornamental fruits.” Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    Require a male and female plant for cross pollination.  This is the female plant that will produce the berries.  Generally only 1 male shrub should be needed to pollinate 6-10 female shrubs.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Ilex verticillata Winterberry holly Z 3-9 MALE

    White flowers in May.

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    $14.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    White flowers in May.  Male plants will not produce berries, but a Male shrub is needed to pollinate the female shrubs.

    Size: 6-16’ x 6-10’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Canada to FL, West to Wisconsin and MO.

    Collected before 1753 by John Bartram who called it “Prinos.” Jefferson described the Winterberry on March 1 in Virginia, “the swamps in this neighborhood are now red with this berry…(it is) peculiar to America and is a real treasure.” L H Bailey (1933) called it,”one of the best hardy shrubs with ornamental fruits.” Dave’s Garden: The origin of common name holly dates back to the 11th century, where the German word hulis and Old English term holegn both refer to holly. Then as now, the Gaelic term for holly is cuileann.

    Require a male and female plant for cross pollination.  This is the male plant needed to pollinate the females.  Generally only 1 male shrub should be needed to pollinate 6-10 female shrubs.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.