Woody Ornamentals

Showing 25–28 of 52 results

  • Hamamelis virginiana Witch hazel Z 3-8

    Oval shaped leaves turn quality shades of yellow in fall then stem-hugging clusters of yellow flowers of ribbon-shaped petals cling to branches from October to December.

    $14.95/bareroot

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    Oval shaped leaves turn quality shades of yellow in fall then stem-hugging clusters of yellow flowers of ribbon-shaped petals cling to branches from October to December.

    Size: 10-15’ x 10-15’, slow growth
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil to moist, acidic
    Native: Que. & N.S. to n. MI & s.e. MN, s. to FL & TX. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds, Deer resistant

    Collected by Michaux in late 1700’s. An extract of leaves, twigs, and bark is used in mildly astringent lotions and toilet water. A myth of witchcraft held that a forked branch of Witch-hazel could locate underground water. Native Americans used witch-hazel leaves for tea. Its oil used in medicines, eye-washes, after shave lotions and salves for soothing insect bites, burns and poison ivy rashes. Illustrated in Catesby’s Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, published in series 1729-1747.

  • Heptacodium miconioides Seven son flower Z 5-9

    Fragrant white flowers August –September then large clusters of burgundy calyces surround the fruit capsules as showy as the flowers on this large shrub or small tree. Ornamental tan and red-brown peeling bark and glossy heart-shaped leaves. “Avant Gardener” newsletter September 2011, calls it the “two-bloom tree,” saying, “more and more praise is being lavished on a rare late-flowering shrub/tree … even more showy (than the panicles of fragrant white flowers) is its ‘second bloom’, consisting of red-purple calyxes which remain after the flowers fall…well into October.” Also recommended by Harvard Arnold Arboretum’s curator of living collections.

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    Heptacodium miconioides Seven son flower Z 5-9
    Fragrant white flowers August –September then large clusters of burgundy calyces surround the fruit capsules as showy as the flowers on this large shrub or small tree. Ornamental tan and red-brown peeling bark and glossy heart-shaped leaves. “Avant Gardener” newsletter September 2011, calls it the “two-bloom tree,” saying, “more and more praise is being lavished on a rare late-flowering shrub/tree … even more showy (than the panicles of fragrant white flowers) is its ‘second bloom’, consisting of red-purple calyxes which remain after the flowers fall…well into October.” Also recommended by Harvard Arnold Arboretum’s curator of living collections.

    Size: 15’ x 10-12’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil. Prune in late winter to make it bushy, maintain shape or reduce size.
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies & bees, Deer resistant.
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England & Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold

    Hepta means seven because each inflorescence has 7 flowers, and codium means flower. Collected initially by E H Wilson in 1907.

  • Hibiscus syriacus Rose of Sharon Z 5-9

    Bodacious blooms of white and magenta July to September

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Hibiscus syriacus  Rose of Sharon    Z 5-9
    Bodacious blooms of white and magenta July to September

    Size: 8-10’ x 6-8’
    Care: sun to part shade in most any soil.
    Native: China and India

    Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.   Grown by Tradescant the Elder in England – 1634. Chinese used the flowers and leaves to make tea.  George Washington planted these near the serpentine bowling alley.

  • Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’ Z 4-9

    Late June to October, circular ivory heads fade to pale green

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’   Z 4-9
    Flowering from late June to October, circular ivory heads fade to pale green. Toughest, easiest hydrangea to grow.

    Size: 3-5’ x 3-5’
    Care: Shade to sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Prune back in early spring to 12-16” above the soil level.
    Native: species in Southeastern U.S. This variety found in southern IL
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit & Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold Medal Plant Award.

    Hydrangea is Greek from hydor meaning “water” and aggeion meaning “vessel” referring to the cup shaped fruit. ‘Annabelle,’ the showy form, first collected around 1900 near Anna Illinois.  The dried root was used as medicine – as a cathartic and diuretic.