Woody Ornamentals

Showing 45–48 of 48 results

  • Salix discolor Pussy willow Z 4-8

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Salix discolor Pussy willow           Z 4-8
    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Size: 15-20’ x 12-15’
    Care: full sun, prefers moist soil but tolerates well-drained soil
    Native: E. No. America incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Important food source for many pollinator bees incl. honey bees. Pussy willows attract queens looking for a location for a new colony. Host to caterpillars of cecropia moth and red-spotted purple, tiger swallowtail & viceroy butterflies.

    The name Salix is from “salio” meaning “to leap or dance, because of its quick growth.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768. This species introduced to cultivation by German plant hunter Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg in late 1700’s-early 1800’s. Willows contain salicin, the pain-killer in aspirin, and used since ancient Greece to relieve pain.

  • Syringa vulgaris Lilac, French lilac Z. 4-8 SHRUB/SMALL TREE

    Single or double, very fragrant lilac panicles in late spring

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Syringa vulgaris  Lilac, French lilac  Z. 4-8  SHRUB/SMALL TREE
    Single or double, very fragrant lilac panicles in late spring

    Size: 20’ x 15’
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe, Caucasus to Afghanistan

    Introduced to European from its native Turkey by Viennese ambassador De Busbecq (1522-1592).  Grown  in Jefferson’s garden at Monticello and Washington’s Mount Vernon.  By 1850 “found in almost every (American) garden.”  Breck (1851)  ‘Alba’ listed in Tradescant the Elder’s 1634 list as “Lilac Matthioli.” Elias Ashmole’s manuscript, “trees found in Mrs. Tradescants ground when it came into my possession (1662) as ‘Syringa alba.’ ”  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.

  • Vaccinium angustifolium Lowbush Blueberry Z 2-6

    The true native bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries

    $15.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Vaccinium angustifolium    Lowbush Blueberry  Z 2-6
    Urn-shaped white flowers in May & June turn to glossy blue berries.  Foliage turns fiery red in fall.  The true native, bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries.

    Size: 2-12” x 3’ spreading by runners
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained, very acidic soil. Mulch, roots shallow & wide spreading.
    Native: entire NE of No. America as far west as Minnesota & South to N. Carolina, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Food source for moth caterpillars, terrestrial turtles & numerous birds (Turkey, Blue Jay, Bluebird, Wood thrush & Robins.)
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Described in literature, 1789. Many Native Americans ate the berries (fresh or dried) or mixed berries with other ingredients for food: Algonquin, Chippewa, Iroquois, Ojibwa & Menominee.  A few ate the flowers.  Algonquin made medicine from the leaves and roots for colic, miscarriages & inducing labor. Chippewa put dried flowers on hot stones to inhale the fumes for “craziness.”
    Blueberries are our native superfood, high in antioxidants, fiber & Vitamin C, while low in calories.

  • Weigela florida Shrub Z 4-9

    Rosy pink, white or red trumpets in May and June,repeating sporadically all summer, described by Robert Fortune as ”fine rose-coloured flowers, which hung in graceful bunches from the axils of the leaves and the ends of the branches”

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Weigela florida  Shrub    Z 4-9
    Rosy pink, white or red trumpets in May and June,repeating sporadically all summer, described by Robert Fortune as ”fine rose-coloured flowers, which hung in graceful bunches from the axils of the leaves and the ends of the branches”

    Size: 5’ x 4’
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Blooms on both old and new wood so can prune anytime. Pruning promotes compact, bushy habit & more flowers.
    Native: China

    Named for German professor Christian Ehrenfried Weigel.  Introduced to western cultivation in 1845 by Robert Fortune who found it growing in a northern Chinese garden.   A favorite of Queen Victoria.

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.