Woody Ornamentals

Showing 41–44 of 54 results

  • Leptodermis oblonga Dwarf lilac Z 5-8

    fragrant lavender, lilac-like trumpets blooming in June – October.

    $14.95/bareroot

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    Low mounding shrub with fragrant lavender, lilac-like trumpets blooming in June – October.  Leaves slow to leaf-out in spring but then blooms its heart out.

    Size: 12-18” x 18-24” spreads by suckers
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: No. & W. China & Himalayas.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds

    Leptodermis means “thin skin” and oblonga refers to the oblong leaves.
    Introduced by E.H. Wilson in 1905.

  • Liquidambar styrociflua Sweet gum Z 5-9

    Star-shaped leaves turn parti-color in fall – red, purple, orange.  Gum ball fruit matures in winter.

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    $13.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Star-shaped leaves turn parti-color in fall – red, purple, orange.  Gum ball fruit matures in winter.

    Size: 60-80‘ x 40-60’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern US north to southern IL & west to Mississippi River.
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant & black walnut tolerant. Seeds food for numerous birds.
    Size: Cherokee made a salve for wounds & sores from the tree & mixed it with sheep or cow tallow for itches.

    Collected before 1753. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Magnolia virginiana Sweetbay magnolia 5-10

    Large, ivory cups, lemon scented

    $17.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Large, ivory cups, lemon scented, in May & June & sporadically all summer & fall.  6” long leaves, waxy green on top and silvery-frosted beneath.  In fall fruits open to reveal bright red seeds.

    Size: 20’ x 15’
    Care: Sun to part shade in acidic, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Atlantic coast from NY to FL, west along Gulf coast to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar source for Spicebush swallowtail butterfly

    Magnolia named for Pierre Magnol, Montpellier professor of medicine and director of the botanic garden. (1638-1715)  This species collected by Rev. John Banister in Virginia c. 1690. One of the mainstays of John Bartram’s seed business, Peter Collinson, Bartram’s agent in England, said, “the name Magnolia will sell a box of seeds.” Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Mahonia aquifolium Oregon grape Z 5-9

    Showy yellow flowers in spring followed by pretty blue fruit with red pediciles. Holly-like, evergreen leaves turn purple in fall for a four season ornament.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Showy yellow flowers in spring followed by pretty blue fruit with red pedicles. Holly-like, evergreen leaves turn purple in fall for a four season ornament.

    Size: 5’ x 3’
    Care: sheltered site (in Z 5) in humusy, moist to moist well-drained soil, sun to part shade
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Birds eat the berries

    Mahonia is named in honor of Bernard McMahon, Scottish nurseryman who immigrated to Philadelphia around 1802. In 1818 Thomas Nuttall extolled McMahon “whose ardent attachment to Botany, and successful introduction of useful and ornamental horticulture into the United States, lays claim to public esteem.” McMahon’s nursery received plants discovered by Lewis & Clark who collected this plant in April 1806 along the rapids of the Columbia River. The Snohomish ate the berries and made a yellow dye from its roots. It cured bloodshot eyes and kidney disease for the Okanagan-Colville. California’s Karok Indians boiled the root and drank the liquid to cure numerous ailments. Steamed roots and leaves believed to remedy yellow fever.