Woody Ornamentals

Showing 37–40 of 48 results

  • Magnolia virginiana Sweetbay magnolia 5-10

    Large, ivory cups, lemon scented

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Magnolia virginiana  Sweetbay magnolia  5-10
    Large, ivory cups, lemon scented, in May & June & sporadically all summer & fall.  6” long leaves, waxy green on top and silvery-frosted beneath.  In fall fruits open to reveal bright red seeds.

    Size: 20’ x 15’
    Care: Sun to part shade in acidic, moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Atlantic coast from NY to FL, west along Gulf coast to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar source for Spicebush swallowtail butterfly

    Magnolia named for Pierre Magnol, Montpellier professor of medicine and director of the botanic garden. (1638-1715)  This species collected by Rev. John Banister in Virginia c. 1690. One of the mainstays of John Bartram’s seed business, Peter Collinson, Bartram’s agent in England, said, “the name Magnolia will sell a box of seeds.” Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

    This item may not be available for shipping. Please email bettya@heritageflowerfarm.com to check availability for purchase.

  • Mahonia aquifolium Oregon grape Z 5-9

    Showy yellow flowers in spring followed by pretty blue fruit with red pediciles. Holly-like, evergreen leaves turn purple in fall for a four season ornament.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Mahonia aquifolium Oregon grape             Z 5-9
    Showy yellow flowers in spring followed by pretty blue fruit with red pedicles. Holly-like, evergreen leaves turn purple in fall for a four season ornament.

    Size: 5’ x 3’
    Care: sheltered site (in Z 5) in humusy, moist to moist well-drained soil, sun to part shade
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Birds eat the berries

    Mahonia is named in honor of Bernard McMahon, Scottish nurseryman who immigrated to Philadelphia around 1802. In 1818 Thomas Nuttall extolled McMahon “whose ardent attachment to Botany, and successful introduction of useful and ornamental horticulture into the United States, lays claim to public esteem.” McMahon’s nursery received plants discovered by Lewis & Clark who collected this plant in April 1806 along the rapids of the Columbia River. The Snohomish ate the berries and made a yellow dye from its roots. It cured bloodshot eyes and kidney disease for the Okanagan-Colville. California’s Karok Indians boiled the root and drank the liquid to cure numerous ailments. Steamed roots and leaves believed to remedy yellow fever.

  • Metasequoia glyptostroboides Dawn redwood Z 4-8

    Fast-growing, pyramidal-shaped deciduous conifer.

    $17.95/bareroot

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    Metasequoia glyptostroboides    Dawn redwood    Z 4-8
    Fast-growing, pyramidal-shaped deciduous conifer.  The orange to brown trunk base tapers and thickens with up to a dozen large buttress-like root flares extending several feet up the trunk.  Feathery, fern-like, soft foliage emerges light green in spring, and turns red-bronze in fall before dropping.  Its branches are well-attached and make excellent climbing.

    Size: 70-90’ x 15-25’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained, slightly acid soil
    Native: Szechuan China
    Awards: Royal Botanic Garden Award of Garden Merit, Yew Dell Botanical Gardens’ Theodore Klein Plant Awards & Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Gold

    From fossil records, dawn redwood is known to have existed as many as 50,000,000 years ago. However, it was not until 1941 that dawn redwood was first discovered growing in the wild near the town of Modaoqi China by Chinese forester, T. Kan. Seeds collected from the original site were made available to the Missouri Botanical Garden in 1947. Seedlings grown therefrom were planted in front of the Lehmann Building at MBG in 1952 where they have now developed into large mature trees (70’+ tall). Dawn redwood is a deciduous, coniferous tree that grows in a conical shape to 100’ tall. It is related to and closely resembles bald cypress (Taxodium) and redwood (Sequoia).

  • Myrica pensylvanica syn. Morella pensylvanica Wax myrtle, Northern bayberry SHRUB Z 3-6

    Green flowers in summer then, "conspicuous in winter when covered with its grayish white fruits which stay on the branches until spring." Bailey

    $19.95/bareroot

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    Myrica pensylvanica  syn. Morella pensylvanica  Wax myrtle, Northern bayberry SHRUB  Z 3-6
    Green flowers in summer then, “conspicuous in winter when covered with its grayish white fruits which stay on the branches until spring.”  Bailey  “The leaves turn a fine brown-purple in the fall, but the berries are the thing – pewter in color, with a texture like those Fourth of July sparklers of childhood memory, they have a delicious fragrance.” Allen Lacy.

    Size: 9’ x 10’
    Care: sun in any soil
    Native: Canada to Southeastern U.S. No pruning needed but can be pruned at any time of year, if desired.
    Wildlife Value: Berries relished by chickadees, red-bellied woodpeckers, swallows, Titmouse, catbirds, bluebirds, Northern flicker & yellow-rumped warblers. Bayberry thickets also provide nesting sites for songbirds, offering excellent protection from predators.
    Size: Fragrant leaves used for potpourri, abundant berries used to make candles. Good road-side plant, salt tolerant.

    Probably 1st collected for gardens by John Bartram (1699-1776).  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.  In 1800’s considered “very ornamental in the shrubbery.”