Wisconsin Native

Showing 101–104 of 108 results

  • Tradescantia virginiana Spiderwort Z 4-9

    bluish lavender to purple 3 petaled stars with showy yellow stamens

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Prominent pendulous buds open to bluish lavender to purple 3-petaled stars with showy yellow stamens. Free blooming from June thru September.

    Size: 18-24" x 24"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: From New York to South Dakota, Virginia and Arkansas

    Named after English planthunter John Tradescant the Younger, who introduced this plant to garden cultivation in 1637.   Parkinson explains the origin of this plant: “This Spider-wort is of late knowledge, and for it the Christian world is indebted unto that painfull industrious searcher, and lover of all natures varieties, John Tradescant who first received it of a friend, that brought it out of Virginia,” (1639). Cherokee ate the young greens and prescribed it to cure stomachaches after overeating, female illnesses, cancer and insect bites.  Menominee revived those “defiled by touch of bereaved.” By 1659 ones with white, light blue and reddish flowers grown in England.

  • Trillium grandiflorum Large flowered Trillium, Wake robin Z 4-8

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    $7.25/bareroot

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    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    Size: 12-18” x slowly spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Quebec to Georgia, west to Minnesota WI native
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    Chippewa made decoctions of Trillium for aching joints & sore ears. Menominee cured many ailments with this Trillium: irregular menstrual periods, cramps, diuretic, swollen eyes and “sore nipples and teats pierced with a dog whisker.” Collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

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    $8.25/pot

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    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern & central North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    Cherokee made a tea from the roots to treat diarrhea; made a poltice for boils and cooked and ate the leaves. Iroquois made a tea from roots to purify blood and a poltice to mend broken bones. It is taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. Ojibwa used root in hunting to bring deer closer. Collected before 1753.