Wisconsin Native

Showing 97–100 of 108 results

  • Thalictrum dasycarpum Purple meadowrue Z 4-9

    Panicles of delicate dangling ivory flowers May to July, purple stems

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Panicles of delicate dangling ivory flowers May to July, purple stems.

    Size: 4-5’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: All North America except Atlantic & Pacific coasts and northern Canada, Wisconsin native

    Collected for gardens by 1842.  Used by Native Americans to enliven horses by giving them seeds or rubbing a poltice on their muzzles. (Pawnee & Lakota)  Meskwaki, Ponca & Potawatomi used as an aphrodisiac.  Potawatomi smoked a mixture of this and tobacco before meeting their woman.  HoChunk used it to perfume smoke. For Potawatomi smoking dried seeds brought luck in hunting.  Ponca boys made flutes from the hollow stems.

  • Thalictrum dioicum Early meadowrue Z 5-9

    Chartreuse blooms in spring

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Hanging chartreuse blooms dangle from the stems in spring

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: shade to part shade in moist or moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Quebec west to No. Dakota, south to Georgia, Wisconsin native

    Cherokee made an infusion of the root to cure nausea and diarrhea.  Iroquois used it to remedy sore eyes and heart palpitations.  The plant also would “make you crazy.”  1st collected by Rev. John Banister who moved to colonial Virginia in 1678.  A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.  Thomas Drummond collected this on the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains before 1800.

  • Thymus serpyllum ssp. arcticus syn. T. praecox Lemon thyme Z 2-9

    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

    $8.25/pot

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    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 4” x 12” and spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Greenland, Norway, Iceland, the Arctic, much of the US incl WI.

    Thymus from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme. This species collected on an exhibition in the Arctic before 1855. Parkinson describes lemon thyme in 1640 but it may be different than this.

  • Tradescantia bracteata Spiderwort Z. 4-9

    rosy purple flowers July-August

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    $10.95/bareroot

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    rosy purple flowers July-August

    Size: 12-18” x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: WY east to MI, south to OK, WI native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Genus named after John Tradescant the Younger, an English botanist, who introduced Tradescantia virginiana to garden cultivation in 1637, when he sent it to his father, gardener to King Charles I.   This prairie plant collected before 1938.