Wisconsin Native

Showing 97–100 of 103 results

  • Trillium grandiflorum Large flowered Trillium, Wake robin Z 4-8

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    $6.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    Size: 12-18” x slowly spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Quebec to Georgia, west to Minnesota WI native
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    Chippewa made decoctions of Trillium for aching joints & sore ears. Menominee cured many ailments with this Trillium: irregular menstrual periods, cramps, diuretic, swollen eyes and “sore nipples and teats pierced with a dog whisker.” Collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    $9.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Placeholder

    $7.95/pot

    Buy

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern & central North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    Cherokee made a tea from the roots to treat diarrhea; made a poltice for boils and cooked and ate the leaves. Iroquois made a tea from roots to purify blood and a poltice to mend broken bones. It is taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. Ojibwa used root in hunting to bring deer closer. Collected before 1753.

  • Vaccinium angustifolium Lowbush Blueberry Z 2-6

    The true native bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries

    $15.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Vaccinium angustifolium    Lowbush Blueberry  Z 2-6
    Urn-shaped white flowers in May & June turn to glossy blue berries.  Foliage turns fiery red in fall.  The true native, bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries.

    Size: 2-12” x 3’ spreading by runners
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained, very acidic soil. Mulch, roots shallow & wide spreading.
    Native: entire NE of No. America as far west as Minnesota & South to N. Carolina, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Food source for moth caterpillars, terrestrial turtles & numerous birds (Turkey, Blue Jay, Bluebird, Wood thrush & Robins.)
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Described in literature, 1789. Many Native Americans ate the berries (fresh or dried) or mixed berries with other ingredients for food: Algonquin, Chippewa, Iroquois, Ojibwa & Menominee.  A few ate the flowers.  Algonquin made medicine from the leaves and roots for colic, miscarriages & inducing labor. Chippewa put dried flowers on hot stones to inhale the fumes for “craziness.”
    Blueberries are our native superfood, high in antioxidants, fiber & Vitamin C, while low in calories.