Wisconsin Native

Showing 81–84 of 108 results

  • Rudbeckia triloba Branched coneflower, Brown eyed susan Z 3-9

    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Profuse, smallish yellow daisies with dark brown cones from August to October.  Wonderful cut flower.

    Size: 4' x 3'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, immune to Walnut toxins
    Native: North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies Award: 1996 - Georgia Gold Medal winner.

    Rudbeckia was named by Linnaeus for his University of Upsala professor,Olaf Rudbeck.  Rudbeck made the surprising claim “that the Paradise of Scripture was situated somewhere in Sweden.”   C.F. Leyel. This species collected by English planthunter Rev. John Banister by 1670.

  • Ruellia humilis Prairie petunia Z 5-9

    lilac trumpets all summer and fall

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Lilac trumpets with dark pink veins all summer non-stop. Very long blooming but slow to emerge in spring.

    Size: 8-10" x 24"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Midwest south to Florida and Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Ruellia  named for French royal herbalist Jean Ruell (1474-1537).  This species first collected by Thomas Nuttall, English plant hunter who found more American plants than anyone else, early 1800’s.

  • Salix discolor Pussy willow Z 4-8

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Grown for its fuzzy catkins appearing in late winter before the leaves emerge

    Size: 15-20’ x 12-15’
    Care: full sun, prefers moist soil but tolerates well-drained soil
    Native: E. No. America incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Important food source for many pollinator bees incl. honey bees. Pussy willows attract queens looking for a location for a new colony. Host to caterpillars of cecropia moth and red-spotted purple, tiger swallowtail & viceroy butterflies.

    The name Salix is from “salio” meaning “to leap or dance, because of its quick growth.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768. This species introduced to cultivation by German plant hunter Gotthilf Henry Ernest Muhlenberg in late 1700’s-early 1800’s. Willows contain salicin, the pain-killer in aspirin, and used since ancient Greece to relieve pain.

  • Scutellaria incana syn. Scutellaria canescens, Scutellaria villosa Downy skullcap Z 5-8

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept  

    Placeholder

    $10.95/bareroot

    Buy

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept

    Size: 2-3’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern US, west to WI, south to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, hummingbirds and butterflies, deer resistant

    Described in Plantarum Novarum ex Herbario Sprengelii Centuriam 25. 1807 Johann Friedrich Theodor