Vines

Showing 9–12 of 20 results

  • Clematis ternifolia syn. C. paniculata Sweet Autumn clematis Z 4-8

    Fragrant, small white blossoms smother this vigorous vine

    $13.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant, small white blossoms smother this vigorous vine in September and October.

    Can not ship to: Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

    Size: 15-20’ x 6-10’
    Care: Sun moist well-drained soil mulched. Flowers on current year’s wood. Cut back in early spring to 6-8” above the soil.
    Native: Japan

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant.  In 1877 seeds of this vine sent from Russia to the Arnold Arboretum in Boston, then distributed to nurseries throughout America.

  • Clematis texensis ‘Gravetye Beauty’ Z 5-9

    Small crimson-red bells dangle from July to September

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Small crimson-red bells dangle from July to September

    Size: 8’ x 3’
    Care: Full sun in humusy, fertile, moist well-drained soil. Mulch around the base. Flowers on current year’s stems so cut back to 6-8” in late winter or early spring.

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from klema meaning “climbing plant.” The species 1st collected by the “Father of Texas Botany” Ferdinand Lindheimer in 1830’s. Max Leichtlin of the Baden Botanic Garden sent C. texensis to Kew in 1880. French nurseryman Francisque Morel sent this selection to William Robinson. Robinson named it for his English nursery at Gravetye Manor in 1914

  • Clematis virginiana Virgin’s bower, Devil’s darning needles Z 4-8

    July-September star-like white blossoms

    $13.95/bareroot

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    July-September star-like white blossoms cover this vine – good for clambering up small trees.

    Size: 12-20’ x 4’
    Care: Sun to shade moist well-drained soil. Flowers on new stems so cut back in late winter or early spring to 6-8” above the ground.
    Native: Nova Scotia to Georgia and as far west as Kansas, Wisconsin native

    The genus Clematis was named by Dioscordes, physician in Nero’s army, from “klema” meaning climbing plant. One of 1st No. American plants sent to Europe – grew in Tradescant the Elder’s South Lambeth nursery in 1634.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello in 1807.  Described by Breck in his 1851 book The Flower Garden: “The flowers are white borne upon cymes, and make a handsome appearance.”  Cherokee mixed this plant with milkweed to remedy backaches.  A root extract cured stomach aches, nervous conditions and kidney ailments.  For the Iroquois powdered root fixed venereal disease sores and an extract of the stem brought on strange dreams.  Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Clematis viticella ‘Betty Corning’ Z 3-9

    Pendulous lavender trumpets

    $16.95/bareroot

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    Pendulous lavender trumpets with bodacious flares bloom profusely, blooming machine all summer into fall.

    Size: 8-10’ x 8’
    Care: sun to shade in moist well-drained soil. Prune back to 1’ above ground in early spring.
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanic Garden Great Plant Pick; Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England; and England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Selection of a cross between Clematis crispa and C. viticella, made in 1932 by Betty Corning.