Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 65–72 of 94 results

  • Papaver orientale ‘Beauty of Livermere’ Z 3-9

    Glossy fire engine red petals with black heart in June.

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    Scarlet, tissue-thin petals surround a purple blotch at the base highlighted with purple stamens

    Size: 3' x 2'
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Foliage dies back in summer & reemerges in the cool autumn.
    Wildlife Value: Attracts hummingbirds, bees & butterflies. Deer & rabbit resistant.

    This red selection listed in Matineau’s book 1910

  • Penstemon strictus Rocky Mountain penstemon Z 3-8

    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Spikes of deep purplish-red bells in summer.  Great cut flower

    Size: 30" x 24"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Wyoming to Arizona
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek. Strictus means “erect.” This species introduced before 1884.

  • Penstemon tubaeflorus Great Plains Beardtongue 4-8

    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory bell-shaped blossoms in early summer.  One of the most reliable, long lived penstemons.

    Size: 36"x 15"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Central Plains N., S. to TX & NE to Maine, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies

    Penstemon is named for its five stamens, penta meaning five and stemon meaning stamen in Greek.  Collected by Englishman Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) who searched entire No. American continent – parts of Canada, from New England west to Oregon, the South, Midwest, the Plains, the S.E., California & Hawaii, finding hundreds of new plants.

  • Phlox carolina ‘Miss Lingard’ Wedding phlox Z 5-8

    bridal white blossoms with pink eyes

    $11.95/bareroot

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    True to its common name, this 3′ tall selection bears bridal white blossoms with pink eyes from June into August

    Size: 4' x 18"
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil, resistant to powdery mildew
    Native: Cultivar of native in eastern and central U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies and hummingbirds

    Phlox is Greek meaning “flame.” The species carolina in gardens before 1889 and cultivar ‘Miss Lingard’ before 1905.

  • Phlox divaricata Wild sweet William Z 3-8

    lavender or white flowers in spring

    $8.75/bareroot

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    lavender or white flowers in spring

    Size: 14” x 20”
    Care: part shade in moist, well-drained soil.
    Native: Canada to New England, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Phlox is Greek meaning “flame.” 1st introduced to gardens by John Bartram. Grown in American gardens since 1746. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll, mother of mixed perennial borders, in 1908.

  • Phlox paniculata Garden phlox Z 4-8

    Balls of rosy mauve flowers on 3' stems bloom from July to September.

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Balls of rosy mauve flowers on 3′ stems bloom from July to September, fragrant.  Perfect cottage garden flower.

    Size: 4' x 3' spreader and self-seeder
    Care: full sun, part shade in moist soil. Immune Walnut toxins.
    Native: eastern U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies

    Phlox is Greek meaning “flame.”  A farmyard plant in North America. Garden phlox first cultivated in Europe in 1732 when introduced by James Sherard.

  • Physotegia virginiana Obedient plant Z 3-9

    Purplish red to rosy pink spikes of hooded snapdragons

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Purplish red to rosy pink spikes of hooded snapdragons July to September

    Size: 3' x 3' and spreading
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant and tolerates Walnut toxins
    Native: Quebec to Manitoba, TX to GA, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Collected before 1750. Called Obedient plant because if you push a flower it will remain in place temporarily – like a child who stays in the corner until you’re not looking.

  • Platycodon grandiflorus Balloon flower Z 4-9

    Balloon shaped buds opening to blue bells

    $11.45/bareroot

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    Platycodon grandiflorus       Balloon flower  Z 4-9
    Balloon shaped buds opening to blue bells from July through September, deadhead to prolong bloom.

    Size: 24" x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies, bees & hummingbirds

    Platycodon is Greek from platys meaning “broad” and kodon meaning “bell”, referring to the shape of the flower. Cultivated in China for hundreds of years where it is called Jie-geng.  The Chinese used the root boiled to cure a chill in the stomach. Mentioned in Man’yoshu, a Japanese anthology of poems written in the 8th century.  German botanist Johann Gmelin first discovered P. grandiflorus in Siberia in 1754.  Gmelin’s Siberian mission, sponsored by Catherine the Great, took 10 years and nearly killed him.  Gmelin introduced it to European garden cultivation by 1782.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s. Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.