Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 73–76 of 78 results

  • Stachys minima syn. Stachys spathulata Dwarf betony Z 5-9

    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

    $7.75/3" pot

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    Emerging from a rosette of charming crinkly leaves, spikes of pink-purple trumpets bloom generously from June – July.

    Size: 2-6” x 15-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: South Africa
    Wildlife Value: Walnut tolerant, deer resistant, hummingbird plant

    Stachys is an old Greek word meaning “spike.”  This species collected from the wild before 1834.

  • Stachys officinalis Bishop’s wort, Betony Z 4-8

    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Stachys officinalis  Bishop’s wort, Betony Z 4-8
    Showy reddish-purple spikes of two-lipped tubes in May and June

    Size: 18-24” x 12-18” slowly spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: deer & walnut tolerant, attracts hummingbirds

    Once one of the most honored herbal medicines. Medicines were good if they had “as many virtues as Betony.” John Sauer, Colonial herbalist claimed “there is no illness brought on by cold in which Betony cannot be administered effectively.”

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    $11.25/bareroot

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.

  • Verbascum chaixii Nettleleaved mullein Z 5-8

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Verbascum chaixii  Nettleleaved mullein     Z 5-8
    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Full sun in well drained, poor soil
    Native: Europe

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins. Described by Parkinson in 1629: “a stalk, the flowers hereof are pure white with the like purple threads in the middle.”