Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 69–72 of 88 results

  • Polygonatum falcatum var. variegatum Variegated Solomon seal

    Solomon seal with white margined leaves, white dangling bells

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Polygonatum falcatum var. variegatum  Variegated Solomon seal  Z 4-8
    Medium sized, arching Solomon seal with white margined leaves, white dangling bells in spring.

    Size: 20" x 4' slow spreader
    Care: moist to moist well-drained soil in shade to part shade. Immune Walnut toxins.
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Elisabeth Cary Miller botanic Garden Great Plant Pick Award and Perennial Plant Association 2013 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    1st identified by Japanese botanist & scholar Takenoshin Nakai (1882-1952) in Botany Magazine of Tokyo 1924. Introduced to American gardens in 1937.

  • Polygonatum multiflorum Solomon’s seal Z 4-10

    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems

    $10.45/bareroot

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    Polygonatum multiflorum  Solomon’s seal  Z 4-10
    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems in June followed by black fruit, the leaves “make a fine mass of elegant foliage,” Sanders, 1913.

    Size: 3' x 10"
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil Drought tolerant. Immune to Walnut toxins.
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Dioscorides named Polygonatum in the 1st century, which means “many jointed” referring to scars on the rhizome.  Medieval herbalists opined that Biblical figure Solomon put scars on the rhizome to demonstrate the plant’s curative powers.  P. multiflorum cultivated in English gardens by 1450.  In 1596 English herbalist Gerard endorsed its use to repair broken bones – mix the pulverized root and drink it with ale to “gleweth together the bones in very short space.”  He also claimed fresh stamped root of Polygonatum would cure cuts and bruises for “women’s willfulness in stumbling on their hasty husband’s fists.” According to Culpepper Italian wives “much used” this remedy.

  • Polygonum virginianum syn. Persicaria virginiana Jumpseed Z 4-8

    Arresting tiny white flowers atop nearly leafless stems blooming late summer into fall; dark green foliage marked with a maroon chevron on each leaf

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Arresting tiny white flowers atop nearly leafless stems blooming late summer into fall;
    dark green foliage marked with a maroon chevron on each leaf

    Size: 2-3’ x 3-4’
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: All eastern areas from central Canada south to Texas, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts birds, bees & butterflies, Deer resistant
    Size: Cherokee made a hot infusion of leaves with the bark of a Honey Locust to treat whooping cough.

    Linnaeus 1753.

  • Ribes aureum syn. Ribes odoratum Clove currant Z 3-8

    yellow flowers smother the shrub

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    Early to mid spring yellow flowers smother the shrub, giving off the most sweet, clove-scented fragrance – heavenly.  Ships only in spring.

    Size: 6' x 6'
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Immune to Walnut toxins.
    Native: west-central US
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.

    Found by Meriwether Lewis in 2 locations -“near the narrows of the Columbia.” April 16, 1806, now Klickitat County, Washington, and on July 29, 1805 in Montana.  Many different tribes ate the berries – Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Klamath, Montana, Paiute & Ute.  Others, Shoshone and Paiute, used the shrub’s inner bark to heal sores and swellings.  English plantsman Wm. Robinson declared that it “deserves to be more commonly grown.” (1933)

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.