Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 69–72 of 79 results

  • Scutellaria incana syn. Scutellaria canescens, Scutellaria villosa Downy skullcap Z 5-8

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept  

    Placeholder

    $10.25/bareroot

    Buy

    Showy, open spikes of two-lipped Blue-violet florets from June-Sept

    Size: 2-3’ x 2’
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern US, west to WI, south to TX
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, hummingbirds and butterflies, deer resistant

    Described in Plantarum Novarum ex Herbario Sprengelii Centuriam 25. 1807 Johann Friedrich Theodor

  • Senna hebecarpa syn. Cassia hebecarpa Wild senna Z 4-8

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    Placeholder

    $11.25/bareroot

    Buy

    6” long taxicab yellow racemes in July – August

    Size: 4’ x 2-6’
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Ontario; Maine south to Georgia and northwest to Tennessee and Wisconsin.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, birds & hummingbirds

    Collected before 1937. Very similar to Senna marilandica except a bit taller, flowers prettier and a slightly bulbous gland as the base of the petiole.

  • Silene regia Royal catchfly Z 5-8

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light

    $8.95/bareroot

    Buy

    True crimson stars, brighter than a stop light, in July – September, from the prairies.

    Size: 2-3’ x 1-2’
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: from Ohio to Alabama W. to Nebraska, WI native
    Wildlife Value: hummingbird favorite.

    In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. This plant pictured in Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, 1811

  • Silene virginica Fire pink Z 4-8 Short-lived perennial, 2-3 years

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Buy

    OUT OF STOCK

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Size: 12-18” x 9-18”
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil.
    Native: nearly entire eastern half of No. America. Endangered species in WI.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds.

    1st collected by John Banister (1654-1692) Anglican minister who searched and found many plants in the Virginia colony, losing his life when he was accidentally shot along the Roanoke River while collecting plants.