Plants for Hummingbirds

Showing 61–64 of 79 results

  • Physotegia virginiana Obedient plant Z 3-9

    Purplish red to rosy pink spikes of hooded snapdragons

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Physotegia virginiana  Obedient plant      Z 3-9
    Purplish red to rosy pink spikes of hooded snapdragons July to September

    Size: 3' x 3' and spreading
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant and tolerates Walnut toxins
    Native: Quebec to Manitoba, TX to GA, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Collected before 1750. Called Obedient plant because if you push a flower it will remain in place temporarily – like a child who stays in the corner until you’re not looking.

  • Platycodon grandiflorus Balloon flower Z 4-9

    Balloon shaped buds opening to blue bells

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Platycodon grandiflorus       Balloon flower  Z 4-9
    Balloon shaped buds opening to blue bells from July through September, deadhead to prolong bloom.

    Size: 24" x 12"
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies, bees & hummingbirds

    Platycodon is Greek from platys meaning “broad” and kodon meaning “bell”, referring to the shape of the flower. Cultivated in China for hundreds of years where it is called Jie-geng.  The Chinese used the root boiled to cure a chill in the stomach. Mentioned in Man’yoshu, a Japanese anthology of poems written in the 8th century.  German botanist Johann Gmelin first discovered P. grandiflorus in Siberia in 1754.  Gmelin’s Siberian mission, sponsored by Catherine the Great, took 10 years and nearly killed him.  Gmelin introduced it to European garden cultivation by 1782.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s. Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

  • Polygonatum falcatum var. variegatum Variegated Solomon seal

    Solomon seal with white margined leaves, white dangling bells

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Polygonatum falcatum var. variegatum  Variegated Solomon seal  Z 4-8
    Medium sized, arching Solomon seal with white margined leaves, white dangling bells in spring.

    Size: 20" x 4' slow spreader
    Care: moist to moist well-drained soil in shade to part shade. Immune Walnut toxins.
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: Elisabeth Cary Miller botanic Garden Great Plant Pick Award and Perennial Plant Association 2013 Perennial Plant of the Year.

    1st identified by Japanese botanist & scholar Takenoshin Nakai (1882-1952) in Botany Magazine of Tokyo 1924. Introduced to American gardens in 1937.

  • Polygonatum multiflorum Solomon’s seal Z 4-10

    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Polygonatum multiflorum  Solomon’s seal  Z 4-10
    Dainty white flowers dangle from arching stems in June followed by black fruit, the leaves “make a fine mass of elegant foliage,” Sanders, 1913.

    Size: 3' x 10"
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil Drought tolerant. Immune to Walnut toxins.
    Native: Europe and Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Dioscorides named Polygonatum in the 1st century, which means “many jointed” referring to scars on the rhizome.  Medieval herbalists opined that Biblical figure Solomon put scars on the rhizome to demonstrate the plant’s curative powers.  P. multiflorum cultivated in English gardens by 1450.  In 1596 English herbalist Gerard endorsed its use to repair broken bones – mix the pulverized root and drink it with ale to “gleweth together the bones in very short space.”  He also claimed fresh stamped root of Polygonatum would cure cuts and bruises for “women’s willfulness in stumbling on their hasty husband’s fists.” According to Culpepper Italian wives “much used” this remedy.