Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 65–72 of 228 results

  • Chelone obliqua Rose turtlehead Z 5-9

    Showy rich rosy turtleheads top 2-3' stems from late summer into autumn.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Showy rich rosy turtleheads top 2-3′ stems from late summer into autumn.

    Size: 16-24" x 12" slowly spreading
    Care: Part shade moist to moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay
    Native: Central and southeastern America
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Chelone originated with French colonial settlers in Nova Scotia before 1700.  They called this plant’s white-flowered relative (Chelone glabra) “La Tortue,” meaning “turtle” in French.  M. Dierville transported it to France around 1700 along with the local name.  In 1706 French botanist Tournefort adopted the Greek word for turtle as its name. This pink species sent from its native Virginia to Philadelphia nurseryman Bartram in 1765. A tea brewed from the leaves was said to increase the appetite.

  • Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8

    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

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    Chrysanthemum serotinum syn. Leucanthemella serotina Autumn oxeye, Giant daisy Z 4-8
    Pure white daisies with golden centers, 2-3” across, aren’t just for summer. This one celebrates the fall.

    Size: 4-7’ x 12-24”
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: SE Europe & Balkans
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    Described by Linnaeus 1753. The Gardeners Dictionary (1783): “This grows naturally in North America but hath long been preserved in English gardens. …each(stalk) being terminated by a large, white, radiated flower; these appear in September. It multiplies very fast by its creeping roots.”

  • Chrysanthemum x rubellum ‘Mary Stoker’ Z 3-9

    Plants form a bushy mound of light green leaves, bearing loose sprays of large, single soft yellow daisies, blushed with apricot. Blooms mid-summer to early fall

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Plants form a bushy mound of light green leaves, bearing loose sprays of large, single soft yellow daisies, blushed with apricot.  Blooms mid-summer to early fall

    Size: 1-2’ x 2-3’ and spreading
    Care: Full sun to part shade, tolerates normal, sandy or clay soil
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds. Deer resistant.

    One of the Korean hybrids, Hybridized in the 1930’s 

  • Clematis recta ‘Purpurea’ Ground clematis, Flammula clematis POISONOUS Z 3-9

    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer.

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    $18.95/bareroot

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    Fragrant star-shaped white blooms May-July on attractive purple foliage, fading to green by mid-summer. Can be trained to climb or left as a groundcover. Handling plant may cause contact dermatitis or allergic reaction

    Size: 3-5' x 2-4'
    Care: sun to part shade with moist well-drained soil. Pinch back buds to maintain purple foliage longer-when plant blooms foliage fades to green.
    Native: Eastern, southern and central Europe.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds, butterflies & bees; Deer and Black Walnut tolerant

    Recommended for its purple foliage in The Gardens of Gertrude Jekyll.

  • Codonopsis ovata syn. Glosocomia ovata syn. Wahlenbergia roylei Kashmir Bellflower, Bonnet Bellflower Z 3-7

    Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Large, single, pendulous, milky-blue bell-shaped flowers flared at the tips. Blooms July-August.

    Size: 15” x 15”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Himalayas, from Pakistan to Kashmir
    Wildlife Value: attracts Bees
    Size: Root is edible (but not tasty) when cooked. It can also be dried and ground into a powder. A famine food, used when all else fails. The roots and leaves have been used in its native areas to make a poultice for the treatment of bruises, ulcers and wounds. Medicinal use published 1895.

    Collected before 1835.

  • Comptonia peregrina Sweet Fern Z 2-6 SHRUB

    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

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    Grown for it’s fern like leaves, this small shrub flowers in spring with insignificant yellow flowers followed by brown nutlets. Foliage is fragrant when crushed.

    Size: 2-5’ x 4’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained to well-drained soil. Prefers acidic, but will grow in other types of soil as well. Drought and salt tolerant.
    Native: Eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies, & birds. Larval host plant for a wide variety of moths, including the Io moth & several Sphinx moth species, and the Anise Swallowtail butterfly. Deer resistant. Nitrogen fixer.

    Genus name honors Henry Compton (1632-1713), Bishop of London and patron of botany.
    Peregrina means exotic or immigrant. Many Native Americans (Algonquin, Cherokee, Chippewa, Delaware, Menominee, Delaware, Potawatomi) used this plant for a wide variety of purposes: Crushed leaves inhaled for headache. Leaf infusions for: round worms, fevers, beverage, blood purifier, blisters, clear mucus from lungs, bladder inflammation, rash from poison ivy, swelling, flux, stomach cramps, itch.   Fragrance leaves- burned or crushed for incense in ceremony, perfume,   Decoction – childbirth, tonic,   Other: sprinkle on medicine to poison enemy, prevent blueberries from spoiling, leaves in fire to make smudge to ward off mosquitoes.
    Collected before 1753.

  • Coreopsis verticillata Thread leafed tickseed Z 4-9

    All summer into fall, non-stop - yolk yellow daisies

    $8.25/bareroot

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    All summer into fall, free-blooming non-stop – yolk yellow daisies atop wirey stems.

    Size: 24" x 18" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade well-drained soil, drought tolerant
    Native: S.E. U.S.
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Exported from its native America to England in 1759. Used to dye cloth red.

  • Cornus canadensis Bunchberry, Creeping dogwood Z 2-7

    white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries

    $7.95/POT

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    Four white, pointed bracts in spring and showy scarlet berries in fall

    Size: 6” x Indefinite but slow growing
    Care: part shade in moist, acidic soil. Needs moisture to establish
    Native: Northern areas from the east to the west coasts of No. America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Host for the caterpillar of the Spring azure butterfly.

    Abnaki Indians used this to cure side pains.  Algonquin made a cathartic tea, cured colds and stomach aches and Delaware reduced body pains. Chippewa, Cree and Eskimo smoked the berries. Probably 1st collected for gardens by John Bartram.  Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.   “One of the prettiest plants for the bog garden or the cool parts of the rock garden.”  William Robinson, 1899. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.