Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 57–64 of 228 results

  • Ceanothus americanus New Jersey tea, Ping-pong tea Z 4-8

    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

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    $12.95/pot

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    Compact, dense shrub bearing bright green leaves and billowing clusters of fragrant white flowers above the foliage in late spring and early summer.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-5’
    Care: full sun in fertile, well-drained soil
    Native: eastern North America, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Host for Spring Azure, Summer Azure, Mottled Duskywing butterflies. Birds eat the Seeds. Supports over 30 bee species.

    Native Americans used Ceanothus americanus to wash injured feet and to cure toothaches, constipation and short breath. Sent to England around 1715 by Mark Catesby, English naturalist.   Leaves used extensively to make tea during the American Revolution. Twigs made a cinnamon-colored dye. Cherokee cooked a medicinal tea from the roots to cure toothaches and stomach ailments. Jefferson grew this as part of a shrubbery west of the house at Monticello in 1771.

  • Centaurea dealbata Persian cornflower Z 3-8

    Rosy dome shaped blossoms with fringed petals May-June, deadhead for rebloom

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Rosy dome shaped blossoms with fringed petals May-June, deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 2-3' x 2'
    Care: sun in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Named for the Centaur, half-horse and half-man who was a mythical famous healer. This species collected before 1803.

  • Centranthus ruber Jupiter’s beard, red valerian Z 5-8

    Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer.

    Size: 24-36”x 36”
    Care: Sun in well-drained alkaline soil
    Native: Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Centranthus is from the Greek meaning “spurred flower.”  According to Culpepper, an English herbalist from the early 1600’s, this plant comforts the heart and stirs up lust.  Parkinson, in 1629 describes it “of a fine red colour, very pleasant to behold.”

  • Cephalanthus occidentalis Button bush, Honey balls Z 4-10

    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept. Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.

    $16.95/ONLY AVAILABLE ON SITE @ NURSERY

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    Perfectly round, white flowers perfume the air in Aug. & Sept.  Red leaf stems contrast with green foliage.  Ships only in spring

    Size: 6' x 8'
    Care: Full sun to part shade in wet to moist well-drained soil
    Native: New Brunswick S. to Fla. W. to CA.
    Wildlife Value: Important shrub to maintain water quality and for wildlife habitat. Its roots absorb nutrients in water and reduce erosion along water's edges. Flowers attract butterflies. Birds nest in branches.

    Many medicinal uses for several tribes – Chickasaw, Choctaw, Kiowa, Meskwaki and Seminole, believed to remedy sore eyes, toothaches, dysentery, hemorrhages, headaches, nausea, fevers, constipation, ailments in horses and “wolf ghost sickness.” Rand 1866: “Valuable for blooming at a season when the shrubbery is bare of flowers.” Offered for sale in Bartram Garden’s 1783 Broadside, America’s 1st plant catalog.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Cercis canadensis Red bud, Judas tree. Z 4-8

    In spring when we need a Dionysian jolt from winter’s hibernation the Red bud’s flowers burst open. Shameless fuchsia buds appear along the tree’s stems, before the leaves unfurl. As spring turns to summer, glossy medium green hearts, the shape of each leaf, replace the buds. Vase shaped, fast growing and blooming as a young tree.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    In spring when we need a Dionysian jolt from winter’s hibernation the Red bud’s flowers burst open. Shameless fuchsia buds appear along the tree’s stems, before the leaves unfurl. As spring turns to summer, glossy medium green hearts, the shape of each leaf, replace the buds. Vase shaped, fast growing and blooming as a young tree. It has a tap root, making transplant a challenge, except when young.

    Size: 20-30’ tall and 25-35’ wide
    Care: sun to part shade and moist well drained soil.
    Native: between NY northwest to Wisconsin, Florida and southwest to New Mexico. Oklahoma adopted it as its state tree. Its immunity to the toxin Juglone means it can be planted near Walnut trees
    Wildlife Value: Spring Azure, Henry’s Elfin & Great Purple Hairstreak butterflies drink flowers’ nectar

    1st described by French explorer and botanist Joseph PittonTournefort in 1716. Collected by John Bartram. George Washington planted this at Mount Vernon. Cherokee and Delaware steeped Red bud roots and bark in water for cures of fever, stuffiness, whooping cough and vomiting. Cherokee children ate the flowers. French Canadians added them to salads. The Garden May 20, 1876.

  • Chaenorhinum glareosum Dwarf snapdragon Z 5-9

    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    $8.25/pot

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    Rare plant. Spires of tiny purple to blue trumpets with yellow throats spring, summer & fall. Love this itsy plant.

    Size: 4” x 9-12” semi-trailing cushion
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Spain
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds.

    1st described in 1838. Chaenorhinum means “honey lotus” in Greek.

  • Chasmanthium latifolium Northern Sea oats Z 5-9

    Graceful, pendulous oat-like spikes

    $10.95/bareroot

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    In August – December Northern sea oats bear pendulous panicles of oat-like spikelets, emerging green and turning bronze. They hang on all winter.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: full sun to part shade in any soil
    Native: Eastern U.S., New Jersey to Texas
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Introduced by Michaux (1746-1802) extraordinary French plant hunter, who searched much of eastern No. America for plants. Indians ate the seeds for food. Used ornamentally since Victorian times for fresh and dried arrangements.

  • Chelone glabra White turtlehead Z 3-8

    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September.

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: all eastern No. Am. except FL
    Wildlife Value: food for caterpillar of Baltimore checkerspot & nectar for butterflies.

    The name Chelone originated with French colonial settlers in Nova Scotia before 1700,  “La Tortue,” meaning “turtle” in French.  M. Dierville transported it to France along with the local name.  In 1706 French botanist Tournefort adopted the Greek word for turtle as its name, Chelone. Cherokee ate boiled or fried new stems and leaves.  Also used medicinally by soaking flowers in water to cure worms, skin sores, fever & constipation.  Cherokee boiled roots for excess gall and soaked smashed roots to ward off witchery.  Micmac & Malecite steeped the plant to make a contraceptive. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.