Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 49–56 of 228 results

  • Buddleja alternifolia ‘Argentea’ Silver fountain butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Graceful, arching, weeping silvery foliage with cascading lavender flowers

    $14.95/bareroot

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    Graceful, arching, weeping silvery foliage and, in early summer, lavender flowers cascade all along the stems like an upside-down mop of purple. It’s fragrant too and, true to its name,  butterflies love it.

    Size: 8-10” x 8-10” fast growing
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Prune just after blooms finish.
    Native: China & Japan
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Buddleja named to honor Reverend Adam Buddle, Vicar of Farmbridge in Essex and botanist, (1662-1715) Alternifolia means the leaves alternate on the stem.  The cultivar’s name ‘Argentea’ means silver due to the tiny hairs on the foliage giving the plant a silvery appearance.  ‘Argentea’ selected at Hillier Nursery in England in 1939.

  • Buddleja davidii Butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall. Monarch magnet.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Very fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall.  Monarch magnet.

    Can not ship to: Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Washington

    Size: 6' x 5'
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Cut it back near the ground in spring. Drought tolerant.
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    First discovered by Pére Armand David, French missionary to China who risked his life in the search for plants during 3 expeditions to China from 1866 – 1872. Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson found and introduced several cultivars around 1900 popularizing the shrub.

  • Buddleja davidii var. alba White butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Fragrant, honey-scented, large, white, arching spikes

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    Buddleja davidii  var. alba  White butterfly bush  Z 5-9
    Fragrant, honey-scented, large, white, arching spikes from summer through fall.

    Size: 6’ x 4’
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Central & Western China
    Wildlife Value: flowers very fragrant, attracts many butterflies, excellent cut flower

    Buddleja named to honor Reverend Adam Buddle, Vicar of Farmbridge in Essex and botanist. (1662-1715) Davidii  honors Fr. Armand David a French missionary who noticed it.  White flowered variety was described  by Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson in 1913.

  • Calamintha nepeta ssp. nepeta syn. Clinopodium nepeta ssp. nepeta Lesser calamint Z 4-9

    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image, June-October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Profuse violet blooms on mint-scented, gray-green foliage gives frosty image,  June-October

    Size: 18-24” x 8-12”
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds

    This subspecies 1st described by Linnaeus in 1753. Genus name comes from Greek kalos meaning beautiful and minthe meaning mint.  It is not, however, a mint and is not invasive.

  • Callirhoe involucrata Wine cups, Prairie poppy mallow

    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June - October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Magenta-purple upfacing cups, June – October, non-stop.  Wonderful for rock gardens or as a ground cover.

    Size: 6" x 12"
    Care: Full sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant
    Native: Missouri to Texas

    Although an American prairie native, Callirhoe is named for the daughter of the Greek river god. Teton Dakota burned its dried root for smoke to cure the common cold and aches and pains. First collected by Thomas Nuttall in 1834. Ferry’s 1876 catalog described it as having “a trailing habit, of great beauty.” William Robinson extolled Prairie mallow as “excellent for the rock garden, bearing a continuous crop of showy blossoms from early summer till late in autumn.”

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Campanula alliariifolia syn. C. gundelia syn. C. kirpicznikovii Ivory Bells Z 3-7

    July-August, creamy white bells dangle on spires above heart-leaved foliage. Vigorous. Cut back to promote 2nd flowering

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    OUT OF STOCK

    July-August, creamy white bells dangle on spires above heart-leaved foliage. Vigorous. Cut back to promote 2nd flowering

    Size: 18-24” x 18
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: the Caucasus and Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Campanula is Latin meaning “little bell.” Described by Carl Ludwig von Willdenow in 1798
    Highly touted by Graham Stuart Thomas, who once referred to it as a “picture of poise and beauty,”

  • Caragana rosea Pink peashrub Z 3-8

    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

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    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: full sun to light shade in dry to medium, well-drained soil. Perfom well in areas with hot summers and cold winters.
    Native: Slopes and valleys in central and NE China, Japan and Russia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant

    Plants are considered to be xerophilous (capable of thriving in dry, hot locations). Described by Nicolai Stepanowitsch Turczaninow in Primitiae Florae Amurensis 470. 1859