Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 21–24 of 214 results

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone PERENNIAL Z. 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    $8.25/pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24”x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.

  • Angelica sylvestris ‘Purpurea’ Wild Angelica Self-seeding Biennial Z 4-9

    Wonderful deep purple stems and leaves with large umbels of purple-pink flowers late summer-early fall  

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Angelica sylvestris ‘Purpurea’   Wild Angelica   Self-seeding Biennial   Z 4-9
    Wonderful deep purple stems and leaves with large umbels of purple-pink flowers late summer-early fall

    Can not ship to : Maine

    Size: 6-8’ x 5'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe in moist woodlands and bogs.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and butterflies

    The species described in Species Plantarum 1: 251. 1753 (1 May 1753) by Linnaeus

  • Anthyllis vulneraria v. coccinea Red Kidney vetch, Woundwart Z 5-9

    Foliage - low mound of downy silvery-green leaves, topped by ball-shaped red flowers May to July – showy, long-blooming makes wonderful groundcover or rock garden plant

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    Anthyllis vulneraria v. coccinea Red Kidney vetch, Woundwart Z 5-9
    Foliage – low mound of downy silvery-green leaves, topped by ball-shaped red flowers May to July – showy, long-blooming

    Size: 4-6” x 12-18”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: sole food plant for small blue butterfly caterpillars. Flowers provide nectar and pollen for beetles and bees.
    Size: Showy, long-blooming makes wonderful groundcover or rock garden plant

    In traditional medicine used externally to promote wound healing and internally as a laxative and for kidney disorders. Species is ancient written about by Greek Dioscordes. Red variety since at least 1753.

  • Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    May - June scarlet and yellow columbines

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9
    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.