Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 181–184 of 194 results

  • Trillium luteum Yellow Trillium Ephemeral Z 4-8

    Sometimes mottled, hosta-like leaves support a lemon-scented, three-petaled yellow blossom in April-May

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    $6.25/bareroot

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    Sometimes mottled, hosta-like leaves support a lemon-scented, three-petaled yellow blossom in April-May

    Size: 15” x 8”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Southeastern US
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Great Plant Pick, recipient of the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit

    First published description by Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815) American botanist Lutheran minister and college president.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

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    $7.95/pot

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    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern & central North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    Cherokee made a tea from the roots to treat diarrhea; made a poltice for boils and cooked and ate the leaves. Iroquois made a tea from roots to purify blood and a poltice to mend broken bones. It is taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. Ojibwa used root in hunting to bring deer closer. Collected before 1753.

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    $11.25/bareroot

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.