Plants for Butterflies and Other Pollinators

Showing 169–172 of 214 results

  • Scabiosa columbaria f. nana Dwarf dove pincushions Z 4-8

    Lavender- blue pincushions

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Lavender- blue pincushions on this short, front-of-the-border flower that blooms for four, yes, 4, months, June to September. Deadhead to promote reblooming.

    Size: 6-12” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained alkaline soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Different colored ones including lavender and pink described in The Garden 1872.

  • Scabiosa japonica var. alpina Alpine pincushion flower Z 4-9

    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Japan’s subalpine meadows
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Described by Japanese botanist Hosayoshi Takeda before 1962.

  • Scabiosa lucida Pincushion flower Z 4-9

    Lilac pincushions all summer & fall

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Lilac pincushions all summer & fall

    Size: 8" x 12"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Central and Eastern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Scabiosa from Latin scabies referring to the itch caused by a mite infestation, which another Scabiosa species allegedly cured.   Collected before 1779.

  • Scabiosa ochroleuca Cream pincushion Z 4-9

    June-October ivory pincushions atop wiry stems

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Looking for a non-stop bloomer?  June-October ivory pincushions atop wiry stems

    Size: 18"-24" x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe & Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name scabiosa from Latin scabies refers to the mite infestation that this plant was supposed to cure; ochroleuca means “yellowish white.”    In gardens by 1753.