Perennials & Biennials

Showing 125–128 of 529 results

  • Chelone glabra White turtlehead Z 3-8

    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of ivory, hooded turtlehead-like flowers encircle stems in August & September.

    Size: 2-3’ x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: all eastern No. Am. except FL
    Wildlife Value: food for caterpillar of Baltimore checkerspot & nectar for butterflies.

    The name Chelone originated with French colonial settlers in Nova Scotia before 1700,  “La Tortue,” meaning “turtle” in French.  M. Dierville transported it to France along with the local name.  In 1706 French botanist Tournefort adopted the Greek word for turtle as its name, Chelone. Cherokee ate boiled or fried new stems and leaves.  Also used medicinally by soaking flowers in water to cure worms, skin sores, fever & constipation.  Cherokee boiled roots for excess gall and soaked smashed roots to ward off witchery.  Micmac & Malecite steeped the plant to make a contraceptive. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Chelone obliqua Rose turtlehead Z 5-9

    Showy rich rosy turtleheads top 2-3' stems from late summer into autumn.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Showy rich rosy turtleheads top 2-3′ stems from late summer into autumn.

    Size: 16-24" x 12" slowly spreading
    Care: Part shade moist to moist well-drained soil, tolerates clay
    Native: Central and southeastern America
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name Chelone originated with French colonial settlers in Nova Scotia before 1700.  They called this plant’s white-flowered relative (Chelone glabra) “La Tortue,” meaning “turtle” in French.  M. Dierville transported it to France around 1700 along with the local name.  In 1706 French botanist Tournefort adopted the Greek word for turtle as its name. This pink species sent from its native Virginia to Philadelphia nurseryman Bartram in 1765. A tea brewed from the leaves was said to increase the appetite.

  • Chrysanthemum alpinum syn. Luecanthemopsis alpina Alpine daisy Z 5-

    Short white daisies blooming June-August atop basal foliage, spreads to form small mat.

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    Short white daisies blooming June-August atop basal foliage, spreads to form small mat.

    Size: 4” x spreading
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: mountains of Europe

    1st described by French botanist Tournefort, early 1700’s. Wm. Robinson (1883): “A very dwarf plant. The leaves are small, and the abundant flowers are supported on hoary little stems 1 to 3 inches long, are pure white with yellow centres, and are more than 1” across… well deserves cultivation in bare level places, on poor sandy or gravely soil in the rock garden.”

  • Chrysanthemum parthenium syn. Tanacetum parthenium Feverfew Z 5-9

    Cheerful, small white daisies flower all summer and autumn

    $10.95/pot

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    Cheerful, small white daisies flower all summer and autumn.

    Size: 18-24” x 12”
    Care: Full sun moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Caucasus

    Common name “Feverfew” speaks for itself, referring to the plant’s medicinal qualities. The species’ name parthenium comes from Plutarch who claimed that the plant saved the life of a construction worker who fell from the Parthenon.   Feverfew was prescribed to remedy coughs, indigestion, congestion, melancholy, hysteria, vertigo, freckles, opium overdoses and for “them that are giddie in the head.” Parkinson.  A favorite early cottage garden flower.   Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.