Perennials & Biennials

Showing 177–184 of 548 results

  • Digitalis ferruguina Rusty foxglove Z 4-7

    Magestic, mottled rusty bells with brown speckled throats

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    Magestic, mottled rusty bells with brown speckled throats clothe the spike in mid summer

    Size: 4-5' x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Southern Europe and Balkans
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Pick.

    This species in garden cultivation since at least the 1590’s. In early 1900’s Liberty Hyde Bailey called foxgloves: “old-fashioned and dignified… The word ‘fox’ is often said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies.” Foxgloves reputedly had the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies.

  • Digitalis grandiflora Yellow foxglove Z 3-8

    spires of buttermilk yellow bells with brown spots inside

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Early to midsummer spires of buttermilk yellow bells with brown spots inside, dress the flower spike

    Size: 36" x 18"
    Care: Part sun, moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Europe to Siberia and south to Turkey
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    The word ‘fox’ is said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies.  Foxgloves reputedly had the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies. This species common in Elizabethan cottage gardens, 1590’s.

  • Digitalis lutea Straw foxglove Z 3-9

    creamy yellow, small bells encircle the flower spike

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Midsummer, creamy yellow, small bells encircle the flower spike on this perennial.

    Size: 24" x 12"
    Care: Part shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Central Europe south to NW Africa
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds

    Liberty Hyde Bailey called foxgloves: “old-fashioned and dignified… The word ‘fox’ is often said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies.”  Foxgloves reputedly had the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies. D. lutea is mentioned in Gerard’s Herball (1632.) 

  • Digitalis purpurea Foxglove Z 4-8

    pink, purple or white spires of spotted bells

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Early summer pink, purple or white spires of spotted bells. Beautiful.

    Size: 3-5' x 24"
    Care: Part shade moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant
    Native: Great Britain,west and central Europe east to Scandinavia, often escapes.

    Druids were fond of this Foxglove because it flowered at the same time as their midsummer sacrifice. First described by German physician and botanical author Leonhard Fuchs (1501-1566). Grown in Medieval gardens. The plant’s use as a heart stimulant was discovered in 1775 by English physician William Withering. The word ‘fox’ is said to be a corruption of ‘folk,’ meaning the ‘little folk’ or fairies,” having the power to ward off witches and return children kidnapped by fairies.  Cultivated in America since 1700’s, with the first documented reference of American cultivation in 1748 by Peter Kalm, a student of Linneaus and a Swedish botanist who explored colonial America for plants. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Digitalis thapsi Foxglove Z 5-9

    Shortish spikes of purple-rose spotted trumpets

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    Shortish spikes of pale purple-rose spotted trumpets in summer. True perennial.

    Size: 18” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Spain

    Grown in the botanical gardens of Moscow by 1752.

  • Disporum flavens Fairy bells Z 4-9

    Upright stems arch at the tops and moon-yellow bells dangle from the tips

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Upright stems arch at the tops and moon-yellow bells dangle from the tips – elegant.

    Size: 25-30” x 16-20”
    Care: shade to part shade in moist-well-drained soil
    Native: Korea

    Collected in 1926 in Manchuria and described in Botanical Magazine (Tokyo) in 1934.

  • Dodecatheon jefferyi Sierra shooting star, Tall mountain shooting star, Jeffrey’s shooting star Z 5-8 Ephemeral

    Fuschia, reflexed petals, looking like a descending shuttlecock or, as described, a shooting star, dangle from stems in late spring to early summer

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    Fuschia, reflexed petals, looking like a descending shuttlecock or, as described, a shooting star, dangle from stems in late spring to early summer

    Size: 18-24” x 14-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific NW Alaska- CA & east in Montana and Idaho

    First collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Expedition at the Dalles of the Columbia River on April 16, 1806. Named for Scottish botanist John Jeffrey, who collected it and explored the Okanagan and Fraser regions with the Hudson Bay Co. in 1851-53.

  • Dodecatheon meadia Pink Shooting Star Z 4-8 Ephemeral

    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

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    Rosy-lilac reflexed flowers, looking like a descending shuttlecock, dangle from stems in spring

    Size: 12-24” x 6-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: PA to Wisconsin, south to TX.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Name Dodecatheon from the Greek dodeka (twelve) and theos (gods), meaning 12 superior gods, after the name given to another plant by Roman author, Pliny the Elder. The species name meadia after Richard Mead, physician to George III. John Tradescant the Younger sent this to England by 1640. “A favorite among old border flowers.” William Robinson, 1899.