Perennials & Biennials

Showing 517–520 of 539 results

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.

  • Vaccinium vitis-idaea Lingonberry, Mountain cranberry, Cowberry, Foxberry Z 2-7

    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

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    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

    Size: 6-12” x 3’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, very acidic soil
    Native: Boreal forest and Arctic tundra in Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America
    Size: Often made into jam, juice, syrup and relish. The berries contain high amounts of vitamin C, A and B1, B2, B3, as well as phytochemicals and omega-3 fatty acids. Historically used in folk medicine as an astringent, antihemorrhagic, anti-debilitive, depurative, antiseptic, diuretic, tonic for the nervous system, as well as treatment for breast cancer, diabetes, rheumatism, infections, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, urinary tract ailments and fever.

    The common name Lingonberry comes from the Norse word for heather, lyngr. Vitis- idaea comes from vitis which is Latin for vine and idaea meaning “from Mount Ida.” According to L.H. Bailey, “Throughout the whole of N. Canada, hunters and trappers, as well as the native Indians, have frequently depend on it for food. It is valuable for the shrubbery border, where the strong contrast of the dark green foliage and the bright colored persistent fruit is very striking.”

  • Verbascum chaixii Nettleleaved mullein Z 5-8

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

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    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Full sun in well drained, poor soil
    Native: Europe

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins. Described by Parkinson in 1629: “a stalk, the flowers hereof are pure white with the like purple threads in the middle.”

  • Verbascum nigrum Dark mullein Z 4-9

    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3' spikes

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3′ spikes from June through October.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil - self-seeder. Cut flower stalk off to prevent reseeding & for reblooming. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe to Siberia

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins.  Cultivated in gardens as long ago as Medieval times. Favorite plant in Elizabethan cottage gardens in the 1500’s.  Described by Parkinson in 1629 as: “a stalke whereon stand many golden flowers with the like purple threads in the middle.”