Perennials & Biennials

Showing 505–508 of 545 results

  • Thalictrum rochebruneanum Lavender mist meadowrue Z 5-8

    Airy clusters of lavender blooms

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Lacy, fine-textured, bluish-green, pinnately compound, columbine-like foliage topped by pendulous, lavender-purple flowers with yellow stamens July-September in airy clusters rising well above the foliage to 4-6′ tall. Extraordinary en mass.

    Size: 4-6’ x 30”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly

    Collected for gardens before 1878. Likely named for Alphonse Trémeau de Rochebrune (1834-1912)

  • Thermopsis caroliniana syn. Thermopsis villosa Carolina lupine Z 4-9

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover-like foliage.

    Size: 4’ x 2’ spreading by root
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Drought & Heat tolerant.
    Native: forest openings in the Appalachians
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1843

  • Thermopsis lanceolata Lanceleaf thermopsis, Siberian lupin Z 3-8

    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: E. Asia, Siberia to Japan & Alaska

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;” lanceolata refers to the lance shaped leaves. Collected before 1753.

  • Thermopsis montana syn. T. rhombifolia Golden banner, False lupin Z 4-9

    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Yellow spikes of pea-like flowers May-June and longer in cool climates.

    Size: 24-36” x 18-24” & spreading by rhizomes
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Rocky Mountains

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;”because the flower looks like a yellow lupine. Collected in 1834 by plant hunter extraordinaire Thomas Nuttall (1786-1859) on the trip to California, the Wyeth Expedition.