Perennials & Biennials

Showing 473–476 of 512 results

  • Thalictrum polygamum syn. T. pubescens Tall Meadowrue, King of the meadow Z. 4-8

    Showy, delicate ivory stamens July to September

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    $10.45/bareroot

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    Showy, delicate ivory stamens July to September

    Size: 3-8’ x 4’
    Care: part shade to shade in moist soil
    Native: along streams & ponds from Newfoundland west to the Mississippi River & south to Mississippi
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly
    Awards: Rated as “excellent” by the Chicago Botanic Garden
    Size: Iroquois smashed this Meadowrue to wash their heads and necks for nosebleeds. They also used it to remedy gall ailments. For the Montagnais its leaves flavored salmon.

    Thalictrum is from Greek meaning “to flourish” or “look green.”  Collected  before 1793. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Thalictrum rochebruneanum Lavender mist meadowrue Z 5-8

    Airy clusters of lavender blooms

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Lacy, fine-textured, bluish-green, pinnately compound, columbine-like foliage topped by pendulous, lavender-purple flowers with yellow stamens July-September in airy clusters rising well above the foliage to 4-6′ tall. Extraordinary en mass.

    Size: 4-6’ x 30”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: Attracts Black swallowtail butterfly

    Collected for gardens before 1878. Likely named for Alphonse Trémeau de Rochebrune (1834-1912)

  • Thermopsis caroliniana syn. Thermopsis villosa Carolina lupine Z 4-9

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

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    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

    Size: 4’ x 2’
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Drought & Heat tolerant.
    Native: forest openings in the Appalachians
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1843

  • Thermopsis lanceolata Lanceleaf thermopsis, Siberian lupin Z 3-8

    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    $10.45/bareroot

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    Thermopsis lanceolata    Lanceleaf thermopsis, Siberian lupin    Z 3-8
    Striking spikes of buttercup yellow pea-like flowers June-July

    Size: 3’ x 18”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: E. Asia, Siberia to Japan & Alaska

    Thermopsis is Greek meaning “lupin” and “like;” lanceolata refers to the lance shaped leaves. Collected before 1753.