Perennials & Biennials

Showing 473–476 of 495 results

  • Trollius europaeus Globe flower Z 5-8

    Ball-shaped deep golden buds opening to nearly orange cups with prominent stamens from May to June & sporadically in September  

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Ball-shaped deep golden buds opening to nearly orange cups with prominent stamens from May to June & sporadically in September

     

    Size: 18-24”x 24”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to wet soil
    Native: Northern Europe

    Trollius is derived from the old Swiss-German word trol meaning “something round,” referring to the shape of the flower. Swedish used the fragrant drying flower petals for a strewing herb. Introduced to European gardens by the 1500’s and cultivated in America in the 1700’s. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.

    Grown by Jefferson.

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Tunica saxifraga  syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga       Tunic flower   Z 4-8
    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    $9.25/bareroot

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    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

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    $7.95/pot

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    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern & central North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    Cherokee made a tea from the roots to treat diarrhea; made a poltice for boils and cooked and ate the leaves. Iroquois made a tea from roots to purify blood and a poltice to mend broken bones. It is taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. Ojibwa used root in hunting to bring deer closer. Collected before 1753.