Perennials & Biennials

Showing 465–468 of 529 results

  • Solidago graminifolia Grass-leaved goldenrod Z 3-9

    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

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    Golden flat-topped inflorescences August to October, loved by butterflies for its nectar.

    Size: 2-3' x 1-2'
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil, Deer resistant.
    Native: Nova Scotia across Canada, S. to FL., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts praying mantises and butterflies.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to “bring together.” Gramnifolia  means “grass-leaved.”  Since 1750’s.

  • Solidago riddellii syn. Oligoneuron riddellii Riddell’s goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod Z. 3-7

    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Golden dome-topped flowers Sept.- Oct.- loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulphur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent, & Cloudless sulphur.   Attracts praying mantises.

    Size: 3’x2’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil.
    Native: swath down middle of No. Am. From Hudson Bay to AK, incl. WI
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and praying mantis. Deer resistant.

    The name Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together. Collected by 1835.

  • Solidago speciosa Showy goldenrod Z 3-8

    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Spikes of mustard yellow August – October.  Not invasive.

    Size: 5’ x 12-18”
    Care: Sun, any soil
    Native: Central & eastern US
    Wildlife Value: Loved by butterflies for its nectar – Small copper, Monarch, Giant swallowtail, Gray hairstreak, Clouded Sulfur, Fritillary, Pearl crescent & Cloudless sulfur. Attracts praying mantises.

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning “to bring together.”
    Meskwaki applied an infusion made of roots to burns.  Chippewa used this to stop bleeding in the mouth and lungs, reduce pain from strains and sprains, as a stimulant and tonic and, mixed with bear grease, for a hair ointment. HoChunk made a blood purifier and remedied incontinence.  Collected by Thomas Nuttall, English planthunter (1786-1859.)

  • Stachys byzantina Lamb’s ears, Woolly betony Z 4-8

    Velvety granite gray leaves, as soft as a lamb's ear

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Velvety granite-gray leaves, as soft as a lamb’s ear, bearing spikes with pale lavender flowers all summer.

    Size: 12-15" x 12-15"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant.
    Native: Iran

    Stachys is Greek meaning, “spike.” Believed to cure almost everything. Italians urged people to: “sell your coat and buy betony.” Cultivated by George Washington at Mount Vernon.