Perennials & Biennials

Showing 425–428 of 490 results

  • Silene virginica Fire pink Z 4-8 Short-lived perennial, 2-3 years

    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

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    Real red, hence the name Fire (not pink in color), flowers of five notched petals flaring out from a tube, blooms late spring and early summer. Named “pink” because it is botanically in the family known as Pinks, Dianthus.

    Size: 12-18” x 9-18”
    Care: shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil.
    Native: nearly entire eastern half of No. America. Endangered species in WI.
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds.

    1st collected by John Banister (1654-1692) Anglican minister who searched and found many plants in the Virginia colony, losing his life when he was accidentally shot along the Roanoke River while collecting plants.

  • Silphium laciniatum Compass plant Z 3-8

    Yellow daisies from late summer to early fall  

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    $10.25/bareroot

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    Yellow daisies from late summer to early fall

     

    Size: full sun to part shade in moist, fertile soil
    Care: 6- 10’ x 24”
    Native: East and central U.S., Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Plant of Merit

    Grew in Bartram’s colonial nursery. Named “Compass plant” for its leaves which face north and south to catch maximum sunshine. The plant’s sap was used as chewing gum.

  • Silphium perfoliatum Cup plant Z 3-9

    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

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    $10.25/bareroot

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    Golden daisies waive at the sun from July to September, its cup shaped leaves hold water where butterflies drink & bathe

    Size: 7’ x 3’
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Central North America, native to Wisconsin.
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Sap used by Native Americans to chew and freshen breath.  Also used to cure colds, neuralgia, fever, and liver disorders.  The Chippewa used to stop lung hemorrhaging, menstrual bleeding and cure chest pain.  The Winnebago drank a potion from the plant to purify themselves before a buffalo hunt.  For the Iroquois it cured paralysis, prevented children from seeing ghosts and illness caused by the dead.  Goldfinches feast on the seeds in fall.

  • Sisyrinchium angustifolium Blue eyed grass Z 3-9

    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    $7.95/pot

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    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    Size: 10" x 6"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: North America

    American garden cultivation since 1800’s.  Described by Nuttall in 1818, The Genera of North American Plants