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  • Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    May - June scarlet and yellow columbines

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    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.

  • Aquilegia flabellata v. pumila syn. Aquilegia flabellata ‘Nana’, Aquilegia fauriei Dwarf Fan columbine Z 4-9

    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    $10.95/bareroot

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    April-May lilac blooms of nodding lilac-blue to purple sepals with white petals on compact mound of blue-green foliage

    Size: 6-9” x 9-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil, Deadhead for rebloom
    Native: Japan
    Wildlife Value: deer and rabbit resistant. Attracts butterflies

    Latin word flabellatus mean fanlike referring to leaflet shape. First published as Aquilegia buergeriana var. pumila in Swiss journal Bulletin de l’Herbier Boissier 5: 1090. 1897.

  • Aquilegia vulgaris Columbine, Granny’s bonnet Z 3-10

    May to June purple, blue, pink or white columbines  

    $11.95/bareroot

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    May to June purple, blue, pink or white columbines

     

    Size: 36”x 18”
    Care: Sun or part shade fertile moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe

    Very ancient plant. Used medicinally in Middle Ages to cure pestilence, measles, small pox and jaundice and remove obstructions of the liver but large doses are poisonous. Aquilegia was mentioned in the literature of Chaucer and Shakespeare. It was a popular Elizabethan (Elizabeth I in the late 1500’s) cottage garden flower. French botanist Tournefort reported that women used the seeds to “drive out the Measles and Small Pox.” John Winthrop introduced this plant to the New World in the 1630’s. White form by 1600’s. Cultivated in America since 1700’s.

  • Arabis caucasica syn. A. alpina subsp. caucasica Alpine Rock Cress Z 4-9

    Late spring white four-petaled racemes

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    Arabis caucasica syn. A. alpina subsp. caucasica Alpine Rock Cress  Z 4-9
    Late spring white four-petaled racemes.

    Size: 6-12”x 20” spreads
    Care: Full sun well-drained soil, vigorous; cut back after flowering to make it full.
    Native: Southern Europe and Mediterranean.
    Size: Perfect for a dry border or rock garden. Drought tolerant.

    Arabis is Greek for Arabian. Cultivated in the U.S. since 1800’s.

  • Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Bearberry, Bear’s grape, Kinnikinnick Z 2-6

    Dwarf ornamental shrub

    $12.95/bareroot

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    “Dwarf ornamental shrub, ornamental in foliage, flowers and berry.”  Rand 1866.    In spring fragrant, pinkish-white bell-shaped flowers, evergreen, glossy foliage and Marlboro red berries in fall.   Great for cascading over edge of wall or groundcover.

    Size: 4” x 20” forms dense groundcover over time. Stems root to spread.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to dry, acidic soil. Needs watering until established. Best grown with protection from wind.
    Native: No. America, Wisconsin native
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England Kinnikinnick is Algonquin meaning “mixture.” Used as an ingredient in Native American smoke mixtures. For centuries leaves used to make medicinal tea as a tonic and diuretic in many parts of the world. Cheyenne drank the tea to cure back sprains. Some Native Americans used it to cure venereal disease, others to cure pimples and itching, peeling skin. Both Indians and colonists mixed leaves with tobacco for smoking. Collected by Meriwether Lewis on the Expedition.

  • Arenaria montana Sandwort, Mountain sandwort Z. 4-8

    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911

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    Perky white flowers mass over a mound of evergreen foliage, May – June. “…(A) very ornamental plant …(with) fine pure white and large flowers … the white flowers appear so thickly in early summer as to obscure the foliage.” Alpine Flowers for English Gardens 1911.

    Size: 4-6” x 8-12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil, shallow rooted so needs occasional water.
    Native: Pyrenees Mountains – France & Spain
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

    Collected before 1753. Arenaria from arena meaning “sand”, the condition for many of the species. Montana means “mountain.”

  • Arisaema triphyllum Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip Z 4-9

    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Arisaema triphyllum syn. Arisaema atrorubens  Jack-in-the-pulpit, Indian turnip    Z 4-9
    May-June striped, hooded spathe, red berries in fall – a favorite shade plant

    Size: 6-24”x 12”
    Care: Part shade - shade in moist soil
    Native: Eastern No. America, Wisconsin native.

    Pawnee medicine men pulverized the corm to treat headaches and rheumatism.  The Cherokee used it to cure headaches, the common cold, ringworm, boils and “for scald head (and) scrofulous sores.”  Iroquois remedied adolescent diarrhea and listless infants with Jack-in-the-pulpit.  Also “for nonconception caused by cold blood” and for “temporary sterility.”  Chopped root mixed with whiskey cured colds.  It induced pregnancy for female horses.   Menominee pulverized the root, placed in incised lip to counteract witchery on the face.  The seed predicted death or recovery for the Meskwaki who also used it as poison to kill enemies.  The Potawatomi discovered that cooking the root for 3 days eliminated the poison.   HoChunk spread a compound of the root on neuralgia or rheumatism. Native Americans boiled the berries and roasted the root, for food. Garden cultivation since 1664.

    **LISTED AS OUT OF STOCK BECAUSE WE DO NOT SHIP THIS ITEM.  IT IS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT OUR RETAIL LOCATION.

  • Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8

    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

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    Aristolochia durior syn. A. macrophylla, A sipho   Dutchman’s pipe, Birthwort Z 4-8
    Yellow, mottled brown flowers like Meerschaum pipes in May – June, mostly grown for heart-shaped leaves on this vigorous climber (climbs by twining). Perfect for creating a screen on pergolas, arbors and fences.

    Size: 20-30’ x 2’ at ground, 20’ on top.
    Care: sun to shade (one of few vines for shade) in moist well-drained to moist soil. Prune to encourage branching.
    Native: Maine to Georgia, west to KS.
    Wildlife Value: host Pipevine swallowtail butterfly

    Aristolochia is Greek for easing childbirth. Cherokee applied decoction of root for swollen legs & feet. Collected by Colonial nurseryman John Bartram and sent to England in 1763. Sold in America’s 1st plant catalog, Bartram’s Broadside, 1783. In Colonial and Victorian gardens, popular vine to create privacy and shade