Our Plants

Showing 41–48 of 585 results

  • Anemone canadensis Meadow anemone Z 3-8

    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    $11.95/pot

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    Pristine pure white petal-like sepals frame many golden anthers in early summer

    Size: 12-24" x 12” & spreading
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist soil
    Native: North America as far south as Missouri, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: pollen for small bees
    Size: Good groundcover under trees where soil is moist, naturalized garden.

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis August 17, 1804 on the 1st leg of the Expedition. Used medicinally by many Indian groups. The roots cleared up sores and leaves stopped nose bleeds for the Chippewa. It relieved the Iroquois of worms and counteracted witch medicine. For the Meskwaki this plant uncrossed crossed eyes. Ojibwa singers used it to clear their throats and remedy lower back pain. Sioux used the root to remedy several ailments – staunch bleeding, reduce lower back pain, sore eyes, crossed eyes and twitching of eyes.  They also ate the root to clear the throat to boost good singing.

  • Anemone cylindrica Thimbleweed Z 4-7

    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    $11.95/pot

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    In spring a whorl of leaves grows from the ground.  Then a second whorl of leaves grows from inside the 1st whorl. A long, bare stem grows from the 2nd whorl of leaves. and then a single, white 5-petaled flower tops the stem. In fall it turns into a green cylinder then transforms to cottony clouds that blow away in wind.

    Size: 2’ x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in well-drained soil.
    Native: Maine to Delaware, British Columbia to Arizona and all parts in between. Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Leaves causing mouth irritation deters rabbit and deer. Pollinated by bees and flies.

    HoChunk and Winnebago put masticated fuzz from the seeds on boils or carbuncles, opening them after a day.   Sioux used the rot, a tap root, to treat burns, headaches and headaches.  Collected for botany from the wild before 1880’s.  Plant emits allelopathogin inhibiting seed germination of other plants.

  • Anemone multifida Cutleaf anemone, Pacific anemone Z 2-6

    Blooming in early summer small six-petal-like sepals, some red, some pink, some white, each with a center boss of sunny stamens subtended by deep palmately divided basal leaves.

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    Blooming in early summer small six-petal-like sepals, some red, some pink, some white, each with a center boss of sunny stamens subtended by deep palmately divided basal leaves.

    Size: 9” x 6”
    Care: part shade in humusy moist well-drained soil
    Native: North America except the Arctic
    Wildlife Value: hummingbirds build nests from seedheads

    Collected by Drummond & Douglas west of the Rocky Mountains Blackfoot Indians called this “Looks-like-a-plume.” The burned seed-head inhaled to stop a headache. British Columbia’s Thompson Indians used this to stop nose-bleeds, calling it “Bleeding Nose Plant.”  This red/pink one collected by C.C. Parry before 1860.  Parry (1832-1890) tagged as the king of Colorado botany.

  • Anemone sylvestris Snowdrop anemone/Wind flower Z 4-9

    Spring and sporadically in fall - pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Spring and sporadically in fall – pure white saucers with contrasting yellow stamens

    Size: 12-20" x 12-20" spreading
    Care: Sun to part shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Europe and Caucasus, “grows naturally in many parts of Germany… ”Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768

    In 1629 Parkinson extolled the Anemone: “The sight of them doth enforce an earnest longing in the mind of anyone to be a possessour of some of them…”  The leaves of the plant were used in ointment made into “cold grieses” was used to “warm and comfort the parts (and) the roote… is apt to drawe downe rheume if it be tasted or chewed.”  Paradisi in Sole Paradisus Terrestris.  The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.” The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. The name Anemone is Greek for the wind, “so called, because the flower is supposed not to open, except the wind blows.” The Gardeners’ Dictionary, 1768.  In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, uses these flowers to herald his coming in early spring.  Grown by Jefferson at Monticello.

  • Anemone vitifolia ‘Robustissima’ Z 4-8

    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and fall

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Pearl-like buds open to single, ballerina- pink umbels in late summer and early fall.

    Size: 30"x 36" spreader
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: early cultivated variety of A. vitifolia native to Nepal.

    The word Anemone is Sanskrit meaning “he breathes.”  The Roman, Pliny wrote that the Anemone only opens with the wind. In Greek mythology Anemos, the Wind, used another species of Anemone to herald his coming in early spring. A. vitifolia first introduced from its native Nepal to European garden cultivation by Lady Amhurst in 1829.

  • Anemonella thalictroides Rue anemone, Windflower Z 4-7

    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    $8.25/pot

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    Delicate white to pinkish cups in spring to mid-summer light up woodlands

    Size: 12” x 10”
    Care: part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: N.H through Ontario to Minn. Including WI, south to Florida & Kansas

    First described by Linnaeus – 1753. Philip Miller grew this in 1768. Named Anemonella because the flowers resemble those of the Amenome and thalictroides because the leaves resemble the leaves of the Thalictrum, Meadowrue. Native Americans ate the tuberous root for food and made a tea from Rue anemone by steeping the root in water. The tea supposedly cured flu-like symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting.

  • Angelica archangelica Biennial Z 4-9

    Spectacular chartreuse globular umbels

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Angelica archangelica Biennial –Reseeds readily  Z 4-9
    Spectacular chartreuse globular umbels of flowers in July

    Size: 6’ x 3’
    Care: sun in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Russia, Scandinavia

    Angelica is Latin for “angelic,” because an angel is said to have revealed to a monk that the plant cures the plague. Ancient – used medicinally for more than 2000 years.  Used to flavor reindeer milk in Scandinavia, to flavor perfume & liqueurs, and to make a French delicacy of candied stalks.  Add fresh leaves to your salad or make a tea from dried leaves.  Folklore claims it has angelic healing properties.  Introduced to England in 1625 by Tradescant the Elder who collected it on the island of Archangel in Russia.

  • Angelica gigas Giant angelica RESEEDING BIENNIAL Z 4-9

    Dramatic, deep purple, spherical umbels in midsummer, purple stems

    $12.25/bareroot

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    Dramatic, deep purple, spherical umbels in midsummer, purple stems.  One of our favorites.

    Size: 4-6' x 4'
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: mountain streams in Korea

    1st collected by Japanese botanist Takenoshin Nakai (1882-1952) before 1917. Professor, author, scholar and official botanist for Korea in 1910 after Japan annexed Korea following the Sino-Japanese and Russo-Japanese wars. There he explored the botanically unknown mountains and forests and introduced its plants to the world through his international contacts and authorship of Flora Koreana. Used in its native Korea to remedy “anaemia, hemiplegia and women’s diseases.” Korean name is Cham-dang-gui.