Our Plants

Showing 617–620 of 642 results

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

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    $8.25/pot

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    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Eastern & central North America, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    Cherokee made a tea from the roots to treat diarrhea; made a poltice for boils and cooked and ate the leaves. Iroquois made a tea from roots to purify blood and a poltice to mend broken bones. It is taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. Ojibwa used root in hunting to bring deer closer. Collected before 1753.

  • Vaccinium angustifolium Lowbush Blueberry Z 2-6

    The true native bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries

    $15.95/bareroot

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    Urn-shaped white flowers in May & June turn to glossy blue berries.  Foliage turns fiery red in fall.  The true native, bearing small, intensely flavored blueberries.

    Size: 2-12” x 3’ spreading by runners
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained, very acidic soil. Mulch, roots shallow & wide spreading.
    Native: entire NE of No. America as far west as Minnesota & South to N. Carolina, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Food source for moth caterpillars, terrestrial turtles & numerous birds (Turkey, Blue Jay, Bluebird, Wood thrush & Robins.)
    Awards: Cary Award Distinctive Plants for New England

    Described in literature, 1789. Many Native Americans ate the berries (fresh or dried) or mixed berries with other ingredients for food: Algonquin, Chippewa, Iroquois, Ojibwa & Menominee.  A few ate the flowers.  Algonquin made medicine from the leaves and roots for colic, miscarriages & inducing labor. Chippewa put dried flowers on hot stones to inhale the fumes for “craziness.”
    Blueberries are our native superfood, high in antioxidants, fiber & Vitamin C, while low in calories.

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.

  • Vaccinium vitis-idaea Lingonberry, Mountain cranberry, Cowberry, Foxberry Z 2-7

    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Evergreen foliage on this shrub, In spring down facing, pink urn-shaped flowers bloom. Then in late summer bright red berries appear and persist into winter. Spreads to form colony.

    Size: 6-12” x 3’ spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, very acidic soil
    Native: Boreal forest and Arctic tundra in Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America
    Size: Often made into jam, juice, syrup and relish. The berries contain high amounts of vitamin C, A and B1, B2, B3, as well as phytochemicals and omega-3 fatty acids. Historically used in folk medicine as an astringent, antihemorrhagic, anti-debilitive, depurative, antiseptic, diuretic, tonic for the nervous system, as well as treatment for breast cancer, diabetes, rheumatism, infections, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, urinary tract ailments and fever.

    The common name Lingonberry comes from the Norse word for heather, lyngr. Vitis- idaea comes from vitis which is Latin for vine and idaea meaning “from Mount Ida.” According to L.H. Bailey, “Throughout the whole of N. Canada, hunters and trappers, as well as the native Indians, have frequently depend on it for food. It is valuable for the shrubbery border, where the strong contrast of the dark green foliage and the bright colored persistent fruit is very striking.”