"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 21–24 of 28 results

  • Semiaquilegia ecalcarata Spurless columbine, Z 5-9

    Dainty mauvish, dusty pink columbine-like blossoms, without the tail, dangle above foliage in May-June.

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    Dainty mauvish, dusty pink columbine-like blossoms, without the tail, dangle above foliage in May-June.

    Size: 6-10” x 8”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: open woods and slopes in central China & Tibet

    Collected before 1891. Named “Wu ju lou dou cai” in Chinese.

  • Solidago sphacelata ‘Golden Fleece’ Golden Fleece Goldenrod Z 4-8

    Dense horizontal golden panicles on this dwarf Goldenrod, August to September

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Dense horizontal golden panicles on this dwarf Goldenrod, August to September

    Size: 12-18” x 24”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: species SE US
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet Monarch, Viceroy & Painted ladies
    Awards: Missouri Botanic Garden Award of Merit & Cornell University Allstar

    Solidago from solidus and ago meaning to bring together.  Species collected by 1800’s but this cultivar selected by Dr. Richard Lightly at Mount Cuba Center in the 1980’s.  OK, it’s not old but it is so different from all other Goldenrods that I couldn’t resist.

  • Spigelia marilandica Carolina pink, Woodland pinkroot Z 5-9

    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Stems topped with showy red tubes and fireworks-like yellow, five-pointed stars flare  atop the tubes in  late spring to early summer  and later in the north.  Deadhead for rebloom

    Size: 12-24” x 6-18”
    Care: part to full shade in most well-drained soil, tolerates wet soil
    Native: NJ to Fl west to TX
    Wildlife Value: nectar for hummingbirds; deer resistant
    Awards: 2011 Theodore Klein Plant Award Winner

    Cherokee used this to purge parasites from intestines. In garden by 1753. Philip Miller’s Dictionary “the plant “is esteemed as the best medicine (in North America) yet known for the worms.” (1768)  According to Jacob Bigelow in American Medical Botany, 1817 one doctor used it as a purgative and another as a narcotic.

  • Synthyris missourica Mountain Kittentails Z 2-6

    Deep blue elongated raceme that curls like a kitten’s tail. Round scalloped leaves hug the ground, with a few small leaves dotting the stalk before the flowers.

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    $8.95/pot

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    Deep blue elongated raceme that curls like a kitten’s tail. Round scalloped leaves hug the ground, with a few small leaves dotting the stalk before the flowers.

    Size: 8-10” x spreads
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: WA, ID, MT, OR and mountain slopes of N.E. CA

    Collected by Lewis & Clark on June 26, 1806 from the headwaters of Hungry Creek in Idaho