"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 89–92 of 95 results

  • Uvularia grandiflora Largeflower bellwort, Fairybells Z 4-9

    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

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    $9.25/bareroot

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    Graceful, hanging pale yellow bells, like a gypsy’s skirt, in spring

    Size: 10-20” x 6” spread slowly
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Quebec to Ontario, NH to ND, Louisiana to Georgia, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit

    Menominee reduced swelling with this plant. Ojibwa cured stomach pains and Potawatomi mixed it with lard to cure sore muscles & backaches. Collected for gardens by 1802. Wm. Robinson considered this a “graceful perennial … the finest of the species.”

  • Uvularia sessilifolia Merrybells Z 4-8

    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

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    $7.95/3" pot

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    Elongated cream colored bells dangle under lily-like leaves in April-May

    Size: 6-10” X 8”
    Care: Sun to shade in moist, well-drained acidic soil
    Native: N.B. to MN to the Dakotas, s. to extreme n. FL & OK
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & other pollinators

    At one time these plants were thought to be good for treating throat diseases because the drooping flowers resembled the uvula, the soft lobe hanging into the throat from the soft palate. A tea made from the roots was a blood purifier and was used in the treatment of diarrhea. It was taken internally to aid in healing broken bones. A poultice of the roots is applied to broken bones, boils etc.

    Collected before 1753

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    $11.25/bareroot

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.

  • Verbascum chaixii Nettleleaved mullein Z 5-8

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Verbascum chaixii  Nettleleaved mullein     Z 5-8
    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Full sun in well drained, poor soil
    Native: Europe

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins. Described by Parkinson in 1629: “a stalk, the flowers hereof are pure white with the like purple threads in the middle.”