"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 85–88 of 95 results

  • Tradescantia bracteata Spiderwort Z. 4-9

    rosy purple flowers July-August

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    rosy purple flowers July-August

    Size: 12-18” x 12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist well drained soil
    Native: WY east to MI, south to OK, WI native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees & butterflies

    Genus named after John Tradescant the Younger, an English botanist, who introduced Tradescantia virginiana to garden cultivation in 1637, when he sent it to his father, gardener to King Charles I.   This prairie plant collected before 1938.

  • Trillium grandiflorum Large flowered Trillium, Wake robin Z 4-8

    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

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    Pure white trio of petals atop whorl of leaves in May. Ephemeral.

    Size: 12-18” x slowly spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist soil
    Native: Quebec to Georgia, west to Minnesota WI native
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Botanical Garden Great Plant Picks

    Chippewa made decoctions of Trillium for aching joints & sore ears. Menominee cured many ailments with this Trillium: irregular menstrual periods, cramps, diuretic, swollen eyes and “sore nipples and teats pierced with a dog whisker.” Collected by Frenchman André Michaux (1746-1802) who spent 11 years in America collecting hundreds of new plants.

  • Trillium luteum Yellow Trillium Ephemeral Z 4-8

    Sometimes mottled, Hosta like leaves support a lemon-scented yellow blossom with 3 upright leaves, April-May

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    Sometimes mottled, Hosta like leaves support a lemon-scented yellow blossom with 3 upright leaves, April-May

    Size: 15” x 8”
    Care: Shade to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: AL, TN, DC, GA, NC, SC, KY, VA
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees
    Awards: Elisabeth Carey Miller Great Plant Pick, recipient of the RHS Award of Garden Merit

    Long-lived perennial-up to 25 years, but slow to mature. Can take 3-5 years to flower and an additional 5-8 years to spread to clumps. Do not remove old flowers- let seeds develop & ants will disperse in the garden to form new clumps. Left undisturbed it will spread into clumps, also can be divided when dormant in summer and early fall. Tolerates acidic soil. First to publish was Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg (1753-1815) American Botanist who produced several catalogues of plants after retiring as a Lutheran pastor.

  • Trollius europaeus Globe flower Z 5-8

    Ball-shaped deep golden buds opening to nearly orange cups with prominent stamens from May to June & sporadically in September  

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    Ball-shaped deep golden buds opening to nearly orange cups with prominent stamens from May to June & sporadically in September

     

    Size: 18-24”x 24”
    Care: Full sun to part shade in moist to wet soil
    Native: Northern Europe

    Trollius is derived from the old Swiss-German word trol meaning “something round,” referring to the shape of the flower. Swedish used the fragrant drying flower petals for a strewing herb. Introduced to European gardens by the 1500’s and cultivated in America in the 1700’s. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.

    Grown by Jefferson.