"New" Heirloom Plants

Showing 1–4 of 28 results

  • Adlumia fungosa Allegheny vine, Climbong fumitory, Bleeding heart vine Biennial Z 4-8

    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

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    Dangling pink to white  Bleeding heart-like flowers bloom all summer,June-September. Fern-like foliage on twining stems

    Size: 6-10’ x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained, acidic soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to No. Carolina west to Minnesota Wisconsin native status-special concern
    Wildlife Value: attracts bumblebees

    Named for John Adium (1759-1836), surveyor, judge and planter on 200 acre farm in Georgetown.
    1st described in 1789 (Aiton, Vol. 3 Hortus Kewensis).

  • Asclepias verticillata Whorled milkweed Z 4-10 POISON

    Fragrant flat-topped clusters of many small white flowers atop single stem surrounded by narrow, grass-like leaves. Blooms July through October. 

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    Fragrant flat-topped clusters of many small white flowers atop single stem surrounded by narrow, grass-like leaves. Blooms July through October. 

    Size: 12-30” x 12-24” spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: all US, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: deer & rabbit resistant. Bees & butterflies eat nectar. Host for Monarch caterpillars.
    Size: root used to induce sweating for Choctaw, Chickasaw and Creek natives

    Collected by 1753. Grown at America’s 1st botanic garden, Elgin Botanic Garden 1811.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Caulophyllum thalictroides Blue cohosh Z 3-8

    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

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    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’ slow spreading to form colonies
    Care: shade in moist well-drained soil, deer and rabbit resistant
    Native: Eastern and Central North America, WI Native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and moths, mice and birds eat the berries

    Collected by Michaux c. 1800.