Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 141–144 of 145 results

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.

  • Verbascum chaixii Nettleleaved mullein Z 5-8

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Full sun in well drained, poor soil
    Native: Europe

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins. Described by Parkinson in 1629: “a stalk, the flowers hereof are pure white with the like purple threads in the middle.”

  • Verbascum nigrum Dark mullein Z 4-9

    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3' spikes

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3′ spikes from June through October.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil - self-seeder. Cut flower stalk off to prevent reseeding & for reblooming. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe to Siberia

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins.  Cultivated in gardens as long ago as Medieval times. Favorite plant in Elizabethan cottage gardens in the 1500’s.  Described by Parkinson in 1629 as: “a stalke whereon stand many golden flowers with the like purple threads in the middle.”

  • Veronica oltensis Turkish-leaf speedwell, Thyme-leaf speedwell Z 4-9

    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

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    $8.25/pot

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    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

    Size: 1" x 24" slow spreader
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Mountain valleys of Oltu and Coruh inTurkey.

    Described in literature in 1914.