Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 125–128 of 144 results

  • Saponaria ocymoides Rock soapwort Z 4-8

    Cheery pink soapwort, in late spring, hugs the ground

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Cheery pink soapwort, in late spring, hugs the ground. Good for rock gardens, front of border or groundcover.

    Size: 3" x 18"
    Care: Sun, well-drained soil, cut back hard after flowering
    Native: Spain to Yugoslavia

    Both the botanical and common names come from the plant’s use as soap, the leaves “yeelde out of themselves a certain juice when they are bruised, which scoureth almost as well as sope.”  Gerard (1633).  Soapwort is still used today by antique and art restorers for its gentle cleaning: chop dried leaves and roots, boil in water for 5 minutes, and then agitate to make suds.  William Robinson, father of today’s mixed perennial border gardens, praised this as bearing “masses of rosy blooms.”  American garden cultivation since 1800’s.  Received England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit.

  • Scabiosa lucida Pincushion flower Z 4-9

    Lilac pincushions all summer & fall

    $10.25/bareroot

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    Lilac pincushions all summer & fall

    Size: 8" x 12"
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Central and Eastern Europe
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Scabiosa from Latin scabies referring to the itch caused by a mite infestation, which another Scabiosa species allegedly cured.   Collected before 1779.

  • Scabiosa ochroleuca Cream pincushion Z 4-9

    June-October ivory pincushions atop wiry stems

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Scabiosa ochroleuca  Cream pincushion    Z 4-9
    Looking for a non-stop bloomer?  June-October ivory pincushions atop wiry stems

    Size: 18"-24" x 18"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe & Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    The name scabiosa from Latin scabies refers to the mite infestation that this plant was supposed to cure; ochroleuca means “yellowish white.”    In gardens by 1753.

  • Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ syn ‘Herbstfreude’ syn Hylotelephium ‘Autumn Joy’ Z 4-9

    Classic, large flat flower heads turn from green to rose

    $8.45/bareroot

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    Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ syn. ‘Herbstfreude’ syn Hylotelephium ‘Autumn Joy’  Z 4-9
    Classic, large flat flower heads turn from green to rose blooming in September and October.  A staple for autumn in the garden.

    Size: 30” x 12”
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Awards: England’s Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    Sedum means “plant that sits.”  “Live forever” is an ancient Greek name for sedums. The Roman Pliny claimed that sedum’s juice treated wounds.  In the 1500’s English herbalist Gerard called sedums “very full of life,” referring to succulent’s quality of being very easy to grow.  Autumn Joy introduced to gardens before 1920 by the George Arends Nursery in Ronsdorf, Germany.