Drought, Xeric & Dry Soil Plants

Showing 137–144 of 145 results

  • Stachys byzantina Lamb’s ears, Woolly betony Z 4-8

    Velvety granite gray leaves, as soft as a lamb's ear

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Velvety granite-gray leaves, as soft as a lamb’s ear, bearing spikes with pale lavender flowers all summer.

    Size: 12-15" x 12-15"
    Care: Full sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Drought tolerant & deer resistant.
    Native: Iran

    Stachys is Greek meaning, “spike.” Believed to cure almost everything. Italians urged people to: “sell your coat and buy betony.” Cultivated by George Washington at Mount Vernon.

  • Tanacetum niveum Silver tansy, Snow tansy Z 5-9

    Profusion of small classic daisies May-July atop fragrant silver foliage

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Profusion of small classic daisies May-July atop fragrant silver foliage

    Size: 2’ x 3’
    Care: sun in moist well drained soil

    Named by Carl Heinrich Schultz (1805-1867)

  • Thermopsis caroliniana syn. Thermopsis villosa Carolina lupine Z 4-9

    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover like foliage.

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    Dense spikes of buttery yellow in June, resembling Baptisia or Lupin with clover-like foliage.

    Size: 4’ x 2’ spreading by root
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Drought & Heat tolerant.
    Native: forest openings in the Appalachians
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees & butterflies, Deer & rabbit resistant.

    Collected before 1843

  • Thymus serpyllum ‘Minus’ syn. T. praecox ‘Minus’ Dwarf thyme Z 5-9

    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers

    $8.75/pot

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    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers in midsummer, spreads to form a tight carpet.

    Size: 1” x 12” spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Size: Great for rock gardens, groundcover, drought tolerant.

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.  ‘Minus’ described by Parkinson in 1640.  He called it Thymus serphyllum vulgare minus.

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.

  • Verbascum chaixii Nettleleaved mullein Z 5-8

    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

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    Spikes covered in white flowers with pink eyes from mid to late summer

    Size: 36” x 18”
    Care: Full sun in well drained, poor soil
    Native: Europe

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins. Described by Parkinson in 1629: “a stalk, the flowers hereof are pure white with the like purple threads in the middle.”

  • Verbascum nigrum Dark mullein Z 4-9

    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3' spikes

    $11.95/bareroot

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    Canary yellow flowers cover erect 3′ spikes from June through October.

    Size: 36" x 24"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil - self-seeder. Cut flower stalk off to prevent reseeding & for reblooming. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe to Siberia

    Verbascum was named by the Roman Pliny who said they attracted moths, calling them Moth mulleins.  Cultivated in gardens as long ago as Medieval times. Favorite plant in Elizabethan cottage gardens in the 1500’s.  Described by Parkinson in 1629 as: “a stalke whereon stand many golden flowers with the like purple threads in the middle.”

  • Veronica oltensis Turkish-leaf speedwell, Thyme-leaf speedwell Z 4-9

    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

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    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

    Size: 1" x 24" slow spreader
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Mountain valleys of Oltu and Coruh inTurkey.

    Described in literature in 1914.