Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 41–48 of 165 results

  • Buddleja davidii Butterfly bush Z 5-9

    Fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall. Monarch magnet.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Very fragrant, large, lilac to purple arching spikes from summer through fall.  Monarch magnet.

    Can not ship to: Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Washington

    Size: 6' x 5'
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil. Cut it back near the ground in spring. Drought tolerant.
    Native: China
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    First discovered by Pére Armand David, French missionary to China who risked his life in the search for plants during 3 expeditions to China from 1866 – 1872. Ernest Henry “Chinese” Wilson found and introduced several cultivars around 1900 popularizing the shrub.

  • Calamagrostis brachytricha Diamond grass, Feather reed grass

    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright plumes

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Arching foliage with gorgeous upright pale pink plumes September to November

    Size: 4' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: East Asia

    Collected before 1856.

  • Calamagrostis x acutiflora”Karl Forester” Feather reed grass

    Completely, reliably erect grass - winner perennial plant of year award 2001.

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Completely, reliably erect grass.

    Size: 3-5' x 2'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Cut back in late winter.
    Awards: Perennial Plant Association Plant of the Year 2001

    This is a natural cross of Calamagrostis epigeos and Calamagrostis arundinacea, natives of Asia and Europe.  German nurseryman Karl Forester’s (1874-1970) keen eye spotted this in the Hamburg Botanic Garden.   He listed this in his nursery catalog in 1939.  Under Nazi domination he risked it all by keeping Jewish friends & workers. After WW II his nursery was the only perennial supplier in East Germany.  This grass sent from Denmark to the US in 1964.

  • Caltha palustris Marsh marigold, Kingscup Zones 3-7

    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

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    Finch yellow buttercups in early spring top round, kidney-shaped foliage

    Size: 12-18” x 12-18”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, acidic soil
    Native: Maine to No. Dakota S. to Tennessee
    Wildlife Value: Attracts birds
    Size: Caltha is Latin meaning “cup” and palustris means “boggy” or “marsh.” America’s 1st people used the roots medicinally to cure colds and sores and to induce vomiting. The roots also protected against “love charms,” (but I suspect the vomiting might have accomplished that.) An infusion of leaves remedied constipation.

    Introduced to Europe very early and memorialized in Chaucer’s poetry, 1549. Grown in the Eichstätt Garden, the garden of Johann Konrad von Gemmingen, prince bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria, c. 1600.

    LH Bailey considered the flowers “very beautiful,” while Rand called them “very showy.” Wm. Robinson described them as “shin(ing) like fires in swamps and hollows.” Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Camassia quamash Wild Hyacinth, Leichtlin’s Camass Z 4-8

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

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    OUT OF STOCK – Available for purchase in Spring only

    Mid-spring spikes of 2” pale blue star-shaped flowers rise over grass-like foliage

    Size: 15” x 12"
    Care: sun to part shade in moist, well-drained soil
    Native: Pacific Northwest
    Wildlife Value: Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer & rabbit resistant

    First documented by Lewis & Clark near the Nez Perce village in the Cascade Mountains. Nez Perce hunters gave Clark a cake made with Camassia.  Important food crop for First Americans. Recommended by Gertrude Jekyll 1908.

  • Caragana rosea Pink peashrub Z 3-8

    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

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    Rose-pink , pea like flowers May-June on prior years wood. Flowers give way to slender yellowish-green seed pods that mature to brown in late summer. Yellowish fall color.

    Size: 3-4’ x 3-4’
    Care: full sun to light shade in dry to medium, well-drained soil. Perfom well in areas with hot summers and cold winters.
    Native: Slopes and valleys in central and NE China, Japan and Russia
    Wildlife Value: Attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer resistant

    Plants are considered to be xerophilous (capable of thriving in dry, hot locations). Described by Nicolai Stepanowitsch Turczaninow in Primitiae Florae Amurensis 470. 1859

  • Caulophyllum thalictroides Blue cohosh Z 3-8

    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

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    Glaucous blue-green leaves can be mistaken for meadowrue. Inconspicuous yellow flowers from April-May followed by blue-berried seeds in fall.

    Size: 1-3’ x 1’ slow spreading to form colonies
    Care: shade in moist well-drained soil, deer and rabbit resistant
    Native: Eastern and Central North America, WI Native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees and moths, mice and birds eat the berries

    Collected by Michaux c. 1800.

  • Centaurea atropurpurea Red knapweed Z 5-9

    Ruby-red to merlot, soft thistle-like blooms June-August

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    Centaurea atropurpurea   Red knapweed  Z 5-9
    Ruby-red to merlot, soft thistle-like blooms June-August, repeating if deadheaded, atop silvery, deep cut foliage, rare.

    Size: 4’ x 2’
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: meadows of Carpathian mountains
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant

    Centaurea named for the Centaur, half-horse and half-man who was a mythical healer. Red knapweed described by French entomologist Guillaume Antoine Olivier (1756-1814).