Deer Resistant Plants

Showing 121–124 of 145 results

  • Salvia sclarea Clary sage Reseeding Biennial Z 5-9

    Breathtaking pastel panicles of cream, blue or pink, bi-toned bracts

    $9.95/bareroot

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    Breathtaking pastel panicles of cream, blue or pink, bi-toned bracts whorl around the stem, spring – summer on this deer resistant plant.

    Size: 3’ x 12”
    Care: full sun in moist well-drained soil. Deer resistant.
    Native: Europe to Central Asia
    Wildlife Value: attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.

    Salvia is from the Latin salveo meaning “to heal” referring to the plant’s ancient medicinal uses.  Romans made an eye wash from this plant to clear vision; the name “clary” is derived from this.  Germans added this, plus elder flowers, to wine and occasionally used Clary instead of hops to make beer.  In 1100’s an aphrodisiac.  This species introduced to gardens from the south of Europe in 1562.

  • Salvia verticillata Lilac sage, whorley clary, Salbey Z 5-8

    Muted lilac blue spikes June to October

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Salvia verticillata  Lilac sage, whorley clary, Salbey  Z 5-8
    Muted lilac blue spikes June to October.  It took 2 years to establish this plant to maturity during which time it was unimpressive but in year 3, it’s fabulous.  You get the benefit of mature plants.

    Size: 24” x 18-24”
    Care: sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil. Dead head to prolong bloom
    Native: Spain to Ukraine, Caucasus to Iran
    Wildlife Value: Butterfly magnet.

    Collected before 1753.

  • Sanguinaria canadensis Bloodroot, Indian paint, Red Puccoon Z 3-9

    White anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, rolled leaves Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    $8.95/pot

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    Sanguinaria canadensis Bloodroot, Indian paint, Red Puccoon Z 3-9
    White anemone-like blooms in spring from the center of glaucus, rolled leaves Ephemeral, dies back in summer.

    Size: 6” x 12”
    Care: part shade to shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Nova Scotia to Manitoba, south to Florida and Arkansas

    Sanguinaria is Latin meaning “blood,” so named for the red color of the sap. Red sap used to make dye for skin, clothing, weapons and baskets. Used to induce abortions, as well as an aphrodesiac and to cure sexually transmitted disease. The root rubbed on the palm of the hand was a love charm for Ponca men.   Iroquois prescribed it for diarrhea and constipation, to draw out slivers, hiccups, and generally as a panacea. It was administered to those who saw a corpse. Ojibwa made dried roots into a necklace to prevent bleeding. 1st collected by Rev. John Banister in colonial Virginia c. 1678. A gunman mistakenly shot and killed him while he collected plants.   According to John Bartram this was “…(C)alled by the Country People, Red Root, or Tumerick The Root dried and powdered is commenced by Dr. Colden, as a Cure for the jaundice, the Powder has been given to the Weight of a Drachm in Small Beer; and by others, for the Bit of a Rattle Snake.”    Grown at Shadwell, Jefferson’s birthplace and home until it burned in 1770. Pressed specimen in Emily Dickinson’s herbarium.

  • Schizophragma hydrangeoides ‘Rosea’ Pink Japanese hydrangea vine Z 5-8

    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Deciduous woody climber clinging by adhesive, aerial roots, with showy flower-heads resembling lacecap hydrangeas, with creamy-white flowers surrounded by showy bracts that age to rosy pink, blooming in July & August & its sepals remain conspicuous long after. Heart-shaped foliage turns yellow in fall.

    Size: 20-30’ x 6-9’
    Care: part shade to shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Japan where they “climb the trunks of tall trees and blossom among the lower limbs.” Arnold Arboretum Bulletin 1933.
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    ‘Rosea’ found by English planthunter Charles Maries c. 1878, collecting for London’s Veitch Nursery and referred to in The Book of Climbing Plants and Wall Shrubs, Samuel Arnett 1902.