Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 101–104 of 110 results

  • Thymus serpyllum ‘Minus’ syn. T. praecox ‘Minus’ Dwarf thyme Z 5-9

    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers

    $8.25/pot

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    Miniscule gray-green leaves, topped by tiny pink flowers in midsummer, spreads to form a tight carpet.

    Size: 1” x 12” spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer resistant.
    Size: Great for rock gardens, groundcover, drought tolerant.

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.  ‘Minus’ described by Parkinson in 1640.  He called it Thymus serphyllum vulgare minus.

  • Thymus serpyllum ssp. arcticus syn. T. praecox Lemon thyme Z 2-9

    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

    $8.25/pot

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    Purple flowers May – August with evergreen foliage on this tiny leaved plant. Good for groundcover or rock garden.

    Can not ship to: Maryland

    Size: 4” x 12” and spreading
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Greenland, Norway, Iceland, the Arctic, much of the US incl WI.

    Thymus from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance. Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme. This species collected on an exhibition in the Arctic before 1855. Parkinson describes lemon thyme in 1640 but it may be different than this.

  • Thymus serpyllum syn. Thymus praecox Mother-of-thyme, creeping thyme Z 4-9

    Short purple spikes in June-July

    $7.25/pot

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    Short purple spikes in June-July

    Size: 3” x 24”
    Care: sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Europe & Western Asia
    Size: groundcover, rock garden, herb, fragrant foliage, thyme lawn

    Thymus  from the Greek word for “odor” due to the plant’s fragrance.  Ancient Greeks made incense with thyme.   This species since at least 1753. Acc’d to Parkinson in 1640 this remedied hysterics in women.  Wm. Robinson wrote,”nothing can be more charming than a sunny bank covered with” Thymus serpyllum.  LH Bailey extolled it as “prized as an evergreen edging and as cover for rockwork and waste places …The leaves are sometimes used for seasoning.”

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.