Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 89–92 of 116 results

  • Scabiosa japonica var. alpina Alpine pincushion flower Z 4-9

    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

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    $8.25/bareroot

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    Lavender-blue pincushions over mound of gray-green foliage, blooms June-September

    Size: 6-12” x 12”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Japan’s subalpine meadows
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies and birds

    Described by Japanese botanist Hosayoshi Takeda before 1962.

  • Scutellaria alpina Alpine skullcap Z 5-9

    Mounds of two-toned snapdragon-like flowers July - October.

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Bailey (1913): “A hardy spreading perennial about 10 in. high, with ovate, serrately dentate leaves and large, purple and white, somewhat yellowish flowers in dense, terminal racemes. … A handsome rock or low border perennial.” Mounds of two-toned snapdragon-like flowers July – October.

    Size: 6-10” x 12”
    Care: Sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Pyrenees, Appennines to the Balkans; central Russia to southern Siberia

    Linnaeus’ imaginative mind named this genus after the Latin sculellum meaning “a little dish,” because of its resemblance to the flower’s helmet-shaped calyx. In gardens before 1753.

  • Sedum album White stonecrop Z 4-8

    Rounded leaflets green turning red in fall and winter; dainty white flowers

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Rounded leaflets green turning red in fall and winter; dainty white flowers in mid-summer.  Perfect for rock gardens, front of border, fairy gardens, roof gardens, troughs and groundcover or any place with drought.

    Size: 4” x 12” spreading
    Care: sun in well-drained soil - thrives on neglect. Deer resistant & drought tolerant.
    Native: Europe, west & north Asia

    Sedum means “plant that sits.”  “Live forever” is an ancient Greek name for sedums. The Roman Pliny claimed that sedum’s juice treated wounds.  In the 1500’s English herbalist Gerard called sedums “very full of life,” referring to succulent’s quality of being very easy to grow.  This species collected before 1671. It “grows naturally upon old walls in many parts of England.” Gardeners Dictionary, 1768.  In 1867 described as “growing, ever so luxuriantly upon roofs and walls (as well as) the rocks at Great Malvern…” Botany of Worcestershire. Landscape designer Andrew Jackson Downing recommended this for edging, 1868.

  • Sedum hispanicum var. minus ‘Purple Form’ Little Blue Spanish stonecrop, Tiny buttons Z 4-9

    Many petite faintly pink flowers in June, soft, succulent, glaucous leaves form a perfect mound.

    $7.25/pot

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    Many petite faintly pink flowers in June, soft, succulent, glaucous leaves form a perfect mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of border, fairy gardens, roof garden, troughs and groundcover, or any place with drought.

    Size: 2” x 8”
    Care: sun to part sun in well-drained soil
    Native: Southern Europe, Balkan peninsula

    The variety minus is considered a synonym of the species which was described by the father of botany, Linnaeus, in 1750’s.