Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 113–120 of 120 results

  • Tunica saxifraga syn. Petrorhagia saxifraga Tunic flower Z 4-8

    pixie, palest of pink blossoms

    $11.25/bareroot

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    Free blooming pixie, palest of pink blossoms from June through October on wiry stems form a 4″ tall mound. Perfect for rock gardens, front of borders or groundcover.

    Size: 4" x 8"
    Care: sun in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Pyrenees and Alps

    Tunica is Latin meaning “tunic” or “coat” referring to overlapping bracts beneath the flower.  Near the turn of the century William Robinson described the Tunic flower as having ” elegant little rosy flowers … a neat plant for the rock garden and fringes of borders and thrives like a weed between the stones in a rough stone wall.”  “Suggestive of a miniature gypsophila.”  H.H. Thomas, 1915.  Cultivated in the U.S. since the 1800’s.

  • Vaccinium macrocarpon syn. Oxycoccus macrocarpus Cranberry Z 3-7

    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

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    Creeping shrub, with tiny glossy leaves, pink flowers, and bright red berries

    Size: 6" x spreading
    Care: sun in moist well-drained acidic soil
    Native: Northern east coast to northern central US & Canada, Wisconsin native
    Wildlife Value: attracts bees, butterflies, and birds for nectar; small animals eat the fruits and nest in it

    Swedish botanist Peter Kalm, Swedish botanist , described this in 23 February 1749 entry in Travels in North Americ.a. Important food for Native Americans (Algonquin, Iroquois, Chippewa& Ojubwa). Pilgrims ate the wild berries. American and Canadian sailors on long voyages ate cranberries to prevent scurvy.

  • Veronica allionii Alpine speedwell Z 2-9

    Purple-blue spikes bloom from early to late summer

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    Purple-blue spikes bloom from early to late summer

    Size: 4-6” x 8-12”
    Care: sun, moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: Alps

    Described in 1779 in Prosp. Hist. Pl. Dauphiné

  • Veronica liwanensis Turkish speedwell Z 4-8

    Tiny true blue saucers smother the ground

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    Tiny true blue saucers smother the ground in May & June – groundcover, front of border or rock garden plant.

    Size: 1” x 18” spreader over time
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: NE Anatolia, Caucasus
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies
    Awards: 1997 Plant Select Winner.

    Collected before 1849.

  • Veronica oltensis Turkish-leaf speedwell, Thyme-leaf speedwell Z 4-9

    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

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    Tiny azure flowers smother the ground in spring-early summer on this groundcover or rock garden plant, or grow in walkway crevices.

    Size: 1" x 24" slow spreader
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: Mountain valleys of Oltu and Coruh inTurkey.

    Described in literature in 1914.

  • Veronica prostrata syn. V. rupestris Sprawling speedwell, Harebell speedwelll Z 4-8

    From midspring to midsummer short blue spikes above prostrate foliage.

    $8.75/pot

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    From midspring to midsummer short blue spikes above prostrate foliage.

    Size: 6” x 18”spreads
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Europe
    Wildlife Value: Deer and rabbit resistant.
    Awards: Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit.

    In gardens since at least 1762 (Linnaeus). Bloomed for 4 or more months in rock garden at Edinburgh Botanic Garden (The Garden, Jan. 1876.)

  • Veronica repens Creeping speedwell Z 5-9

    Palest of blue blooms in spring

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    Palest of blue blooms in spring on this low, creeping groundcover. Best for rock gardens, troughs, or front of the border.

    Size: 2” x 8-12”
    Care: full sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Corsica

    According to Christian tradition, as Jesus carried the cross to Calvary a woman wiped his face with her handkerchief, leaving the imprint of Christ’s features, the vera iconica, meaning “the true likeness.”  When the Catholic Church canonized the woman the Church named her Saint Veronica.  Medieval gardeners named the plant after her due to a perceived likeness of the flower to her handkerchief.  This species collected by 1800.  According to William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial garden, Veronica repens “clothes the soil with a soft carpet of bright green foliage, covered in spring with pale bluish flowers.”

  • Viola corsica Corsican violet Z 4-8

    Rare species violet. Clouds of blue violets with veined heart leading to tiny yellow centers

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    Rare species violet. Clouds of blue violets with veined heart leading to tiny yellow centers from late spring thru fall-blooms its head off. Reliably perennial. More heat tolerant than pansies.

    Size: 5-7” x 8-10”
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil.
    Native: Corsica

    1st described by Swedish botanist Carl Fredrik Nyman before 1893.