Alpine, Rock, Miniature, Bonsai and Railroad Gardens

Showing 97–104 of 117 results

  • Semiaquilegia ecalcarata Spurless columbine, Z 5-9

    Dainty mauvish, dusty pink columbine-like blossoms, without the tail, dangle above foliage in May-June.

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    Dainty mauvish, dusty pink columbine-like blossoms, without the tail, dangle above foliage in May-June.

    Size: 6-10” x 8”
    Care: sun to part shade in well-drained soil
    Native: open woods and slopes in central China & Tibet

    Collected before 1891. Named “Wu ju lou dou cai” in Chinese.

  • Sempervivum tectorum Hens and chicks Z 3-10

    Rosettes of succulent leaves

    $7.75/bareroot

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    Rosettes of succulent leaves

    Size: 4” x 4”
    Care: sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Alps & Pyrenees Mountains

    Grown in gardens for thousands of years.  Sempervivum means “live forever.”  Romans planted Hens and chicks on their roofs to ward off lightning.  As a succulent it holds water and is probably more difficult to catch fire.  “This practice was preserved for historians when Charlemagne (720-814), first Holy Roman Emperor and unifier of a large part of northern Europe, ordered that all villagers within his crown lands plant houseleeks on their roofs, presumably as a safety measure. He decreed: Et ille hortulanus habeat super domum suam Iovis barbam. (And the gardener shall have house-leeks growing on his house. Capitulare de villis, about 795,  LXX.)”

  • Silene alpestris Alpine catchfly Z. 5-8

    It flowers in May (through August) the flowers being of a polished whiteness

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    “It flowers in May (through August) the flowers being of a polished whiteness, with the petals notched, and abundantly produced over the shining green masses of leaves.” Robinson 1903

    Size: 4-6” x
    Care: full sun in well-drained soil
    Native: European Alps

    Collected in Austria by 1773

  • Silene schafta Schaft’s catchfly, Moss Z 5-7

    spectacular late season blooms – bright magenta flowers September to October

    $11.95/bareroot

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    One of the spectacular late season blooms – bright magenta flowers September to October

    Size: 6” x Slowly spreading
    Care: full sun in well-drained to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Russia

    Perfect for dry borders or rock gardens.
    Introduced from its native Russia in 1844.  In Greek mythology Silene was a companion of Bacchus who was covered with foam. William Robinson, father of the mixed perennial border, described the flowers of this species as being “very neat tufts.”

  • Silene suecica syn. Lychnis alpina Arctic campion Z 4-8

    Rosy racemes May- June emerge from a mound of grass-like leaves

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    Rosy racemes May- June emerge from a mound of grass-like leaves.  Short-lived but reseeds.

    Size: 5” x 6”
    Care: Sun to part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Northern Asia & Europe

    In gardens before 1753.  May 6, 1876 The Garden described its flowers as “forming bright rosy patches…”

  • Sisyrinchium angustifolium Blue eyed grass Z 3-9

    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    $8.75/bareroot

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    Petite iris-like foliage sporting blue saucer-shaped flowers with bright yellow stamens in summer.

    Size: 10" x 6"
    Care: Sun in moist well-drained to well-drained soil
    Native: North America

    American garden cultivation since 1800’s.  Described by Nuttall in 1818, The Genera of North American Plants

  • Synthyris missourica Mountain Kittentails Z 5-9

    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

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    $9.95/pot

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    Spring flowering, true blue short stalks above leathery, evergreen leaves, circular with tooth margins.

    Size: 5-12” x 12” spreading into clumps by rhizomes.
    Care: sun to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil
    Native: Mountains of northeast CA, Washington, Idaho & west to Montana

    Collected by Meriwether Lewis on June 26, 1806 in today’s Idaho near the headwaters of what they named Hungry Creek. Common name kittentails imaginatively named for the flower stalk and its protruding stamens resembling, if you squint real hard and maybe after taking a swig of whiskey,  fuzzy, blue kitten tails.

  • Talinum calycinum syn. Phemeranthus calycanthus Rock rose, Fameflower Z 6-9

    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

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    Bright mauve flowers dance on wiry stems in afternoons all summer, closing at night. Leaves are succulent.

    Size: 8-12” x 4”
    Care: Sun in well-drained soil
    Native: western Plains states

    Collected by Dr. Frederick Wislizenus, German immigrant and medical partner of George Engelmann, on an exploring trip of Texas, New Mexico and Mexico in 1846.