Search Results for: bleeding heart vine

  • Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7

    Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger Z 3-7 Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves....

    $8.25/bareroot

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    Asarum canadense syn. Hexastylis canadense Wild ginger    Z 3-7
    Concealed brown bells with flared tips hide under this groundcover’s crinkled, lacquered, round leaves.

    Size: 6" x 6" spreading
    Care: part shade to shade, moist well-drained soil
    Native: Canada to North Carolina, Wisconsin native

    Native Americans used Wild ginger for such diverse purposes as flavoring food, cure heart palpitations, induce menstrual cycles, cure “the bite of the serpent,” mend broken bones and lure catfish. Colonists used the plant to break fever and stimulate the appetite.

  • Centranthus ruber Jupiter’s beard, red valerian Z 5-8

    OUT OF STOCK Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer....

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    OUT OF STOCK

    Cluster of crimson, star-shaped florets atop 2’ stems bloom their heads of ALL summer.

    Size: 24-36”x 36”
    Care: Sun in well-drained alkaline soil
    Native: Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Centranthus is from the Greek meaning “spurred flower.”  According to Culpepper, an English herbalist from the early 1600’s, this plant comforts the heart and stirs up lust.  Parkinson, in 1629 describes it “of a fine red colour, very pleasant to behold.”

  • Aquilegia canadensis Canada Columbine Z 3-9

    OUT OF STOCK May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines...

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    OUT OF STOCK

    May – June, scarlet and yellow columbines

    Size: 24-36”x 12”
    Care: part shade in moist well-drained soil
    Native: Eastern Canada to Florida, west to New Mexico, Wisconsin native.
    Wildlife Value: Rich, sugary nectar important food for ruby-throated hummingbirds. Buntings and finches eat the seeds. Sole food source for columbine duskywing caterpillar.

    Seeds are fragrant when crushed, used by Omaha, Ponca and Pawnee as perfume. Pawnee used the plant as a love charm by rubbing pulverized seeds in palm of hand and endeavoring to shake hand of desired person. Crushed seeds also used to cure fever and headaches. Cherokee made a tea for heart trouble. The Iroquois used the plant to cure poisoning and to detect people who were bewitched. Grown by Englishman Tradescant the Elder in 1632. He may have received it from France. Cultivated by Washington & Jefferson.

  • Lavandula angustifolia Lavender Z 5-9

    OUT OF STOCK The best fragrance – in both flowers & foliage. Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer....

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    OUT OF STOCK

    The best fragrance – in both flowers & foliage. Lavender spikes in June on this short shrub and rebloom in late summer.

    Size: 24" x 4'
    Care: Sun, well-drained soil. Well-drained soil essential. Drought tolerant.
    Native: Western Mediterranean
    Wildlife Value: attracts butterflies

    Name is from Latin lavare meaning “to wash” because Romans scented their baths with lavender. Ancient Phoenicians used lavender to make perfume. Charlemagne’s list of cultivated plants in his empire included lavender, c. 800 A.D. Cultivated in Islamic gardens by 1050. Elizabeth I ate lavender conserve, made by adding sugar to the flowers while Charles VI of France stuffed pillows with lavender and sat on them. Culpepper wrote that lavender was grown in almost every garden and cured headaches, apoplexy, dropsy, fainting, toothaches, and “passions of the heart.”

  • Galium odoratum Sweet woodruff, Bedstraw Z 4-8

    Whorls of fine textured leaves, like spokes of a wheel, with white blooms in spring light up the shade. Makes great groundcover, especially under trees & shrubs...

    $6.95/pot

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    Whorls of fine textured leaves, like spokes of a wheel, with white blooms in spring light up the shade. Makes great groundcover, especially under trees & shrubs

    Size: 6-12" x 18" spreading
    Care: shade to part shade in moist to moist well-drained soil. Tolerant Walnut toxicity. Deer resistant.
    Native: Europe and Mediterranean area

    Called “Bedstraw” because, according to legend, Mary rested on hay of Bedstraw on Christmas.  Bedstraw made May wine, an ancient herbal remedy: handful of dried and crushed leaves plus fresh lemon juice steeped in wine for 3-4 hours “makes a man merry and (is) good for the heart and liver” per Gerard, 1633.  Garlands hanging in houses in summer “coole and make fresh the place, to the delight and comfort of such as are therein.”  Gerard.  Dried branches give a grassy vanilla fragrance, used in sachets and potpourris, as an insect repellant and to make grey-green dyes.

  • Filipendula rubra Queen of the Prairie Z 3-9

    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, midsummer

    $10.95/bareroot

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    Extraordinary frothy pink plumes, like cotton candy, midsummer

    Size: 4-6’ x 4-5'
    Care: sun to part shade in moist well-drained to moist soil
    Native: eastern U.S., Wisconsin native

    Name is Latin filum pendulus meaning “hanging by a thread” referring to threads on the roots of Filipendula. Meskwaki Indians used it for heart ailments and as an aphrodisiac.   Grown in American gardens since 1900.